Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach

By Amia Lieblich | Go to book overview

Foreword

This book is a profile of Israel, a real-life profile.

I thought it needed no introduction, nor any opening, interpretation, or background. I wanted its stories, the "cases" of the people and the groups, to stand as separate units, as in a collection of photographs combined into an album. The documents could speak for themselves, and the readers would find their own personal meaning in each. It may be a bad habit, but in art books or photograph collections I rarely want to read the instructions written by others, who have already gone through what I am going to experience. Sometimes, however, I am interested in the introduction afterward.

Presenting the material of this book to readers of a foreign culture made some words of explanation indispensable, to be read either before or after the cases and interviews. The reader may choose his or her own preferred order, starting with the emotional account ("The Unfinished Business of War in Israel"), the descriptive report ("Peaceful Conversations About the War"), or the more intellectual discussion (the introduction to each section, and the first part of the book).

In the records collected and presented for the book, I served in at least two distinct roles: that of the therapist, group leader, or interviewer on the one hand, and that of the observer, recorder,* and writer of the group encounters on the other. A third unmanifested role I frequently took was that of the client, with whom I identified and through whom I sometimes coped with my personal dilemmas, with or without total awareness of this process. This is, apparently, the situation of the participant

____________________
*
One year, in 1975, Aliza Leventhal was an observer who took down a complete record of all the group sessions. The other clinical material is based on my post-session notes. The interviews were all tape-recorded. In addition, part of the material is based on written records and papers of my group members.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part 1 - VVhen Cannons Are Stilled, Let Voices Be Heard 1
  • Six Wars 3
  • On War and Sanity 7
  • Overview of Gestalt Therapy 11
  • The Groups 18
  • Reactions 21
  • Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach 24
  • Part 2 - The Unfinished Business of War in Israel 25
  • War as a Symbol 27
  • On Freedom and Country 46
  • Reminders of the Holocaust 75
  • War and the Family 95
  • Early Effects of the War 116
  • The Wheelchair Group of 1974__ 143
  • New Group, Old War 160
  • The Shadow of War 193
  • Part 3 - Peacetime Conversations About War 205
  • The Women 261
  • About the Book 289
  • Recommended Readings 305
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 307

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.