Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective

By Ross W. Sanderson | Go to book overview

REFERENCE NOTES

Preface
1
Christian Century, Dec. 23, 1959

Chapter 1
1
Raymond A. Gray, "The Ecumenical Necessity", STM Thesis, Union Theological Seminary, New York, April 1958. Unpublished MS.
2
Sanford E. B., ed., Church Federation--The Interchurch Conference on Federation, New York, November 15 to 21, 1905. p.v.
3
Mark Rich, The Rural Church Movement, Juniper Knoll Press, 1957, pp. 5, 9, 16. Used by permission.
4
Hutchison, We Are Not Divided, Round Table Press, 1941, p. 8. Used by permission.
5
Rich, op. cit. pp. 13, 16, 21.
6
H. Paul Douglass, Christian Unity Movements in the U.S., Institute for Social and Religious Research, 1934, p. 30.
7
Hutchison, op. cit., p. 8.
8
Quoted in Macfarland, Christian Unity in the Making, Federal Council of Churches, 1948, p. 13.
9
See particularly, Gilbert Barnes, The Anti-Slavery Impulse, 1830-1844, Appleton-Century, 1933; especially Chapter II on "The New York Philanthropists."
10
"As extrachurch agencies, the voluntary societies were explicitly designed to overcome the disadvantages of the denominational system and to provide an opportunity for Christians to unite in matters of common concern." Though providing a "new feeling of solidarity," and often called interdenominational, they were technically undenominational societies. Winthrop S. Hudson , The Great Tradition of the American Churches, Harper, 1953, p. 77. Prof. Hudson ably sets forth both the greatness and the weakness of organized Protestantism in American life; his volume will provide the reader with excellent collateral reading.
11
Macfarland, op. cit., p. 18.
12
Ibid., p. 19; also his Christian Unity in Practice and Prophecy, Macmillan, 1933, p. 36. Likewise, Prof. John W. Nevin, of the faculty of the Mercersburg Theological Seminary (Reformed Church in the U.S.), a denominational representative on the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions from 1840 to 1865, has been called by R. Pearce Beaver "the great father of the Mercersburg Movement (in the German Reformed Church)--the most important native American contribution to ecumenical thinking in the nineteenth century." (Quoted by Fred Field Goodsell, in You Shall Be My Witnesses, ABCFM, 1959, p. 136 note.)
13
C. Howard Hopkins, History of the YMCA in America, Association Press, 1951, p. 12. Used by permission.
14
Hutchison, op. cit., p. 12.
15
Hopkins, op. cit., pp. 7, 8.
16
Washington Gladden, Recollections, Houghton Mifflin, 1909, p. 34.
17
According to Winthrop S. Hudson, there is ground for believing that the whole grass-roots organizational development "was sparked by the sociological studies of the religious needs of the cities by the American Christian Commission during the late 1860's and the 1870's, for the need for united action was constantly stressed and numerous proposals were offered and implemented." Personal letter, December 15, 1959.
18
Gladden, op. cit., p. 114.

-28-

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Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Preface 9
  • Some Interdenomination Abbreviations 11
  • Chapter I- The American Scene 12
  • Reference Notes 28
  • Chapter II- The Sunday School Movement in the United States 31
  • Reference Notes 52
  • Chapter III- Federative Progress, 1900-1908 54
  • Reference Notes 75
  • Chapter IV- Shakedown Voyage, 1908-1915 77
  • Reference Notes 98
  • Chapter V- First Period of Expansion, 1915-1924 99
  • Reference Notes 123
  • Chapter VI- Appraisal and Testing, 1925-1931 125
  • Reference Notes 149
  • Chapter VII- The Merging Thirties 152
  • Reference Notes 179
  • Chapter VIII- The Expectant Forties 182
  • Reference Notes 204
  • Chapter IX- Since 1950, Solid Growth 205
  • Reference Notes 231
  • Chapter X- Meanings and Expectations 233
  • Reference Notes 252
  • Appendix I 259
  • Appendix II 262
  • Index 267
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