Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective

By Ross W. Sanderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
The Expectant Forties

Planet Shrinks, Councils Consolidate

With consolidation of church cooperation forces now just around the comer," the whole movement pushed forward vigorously during the 1940's. This chapter will sketch first the enlargement of the professional fellowship of local, state, and national executives; and will then turn to national and world developments, interspersed with instances of the state and local cooperative enterprise.


The "New Order" Enlarges Its Fellowship

A week after Hitler invaded. Russia, the ACS met, June 20 to July 5, 1941, at Conference Point, in its first annual meeting as a unified body. Those attending included 36 city, 19 national, and 11 state secretaries; these with wives, special leaders, and others, made a total of 84 persons. Various ICRE papers were presented, and also documents on "Missions in Local Councils," "Field Program and Research," and other topics. It was felt that "a definite foundation of conviction (should be) brought to the committee on arrangements arid also to the conference on relations of interdenominational agencies, expressing the mind of state and city executives with respect to plans for any new all-inclusive interdenominational agency, and that we should be represented on the committee and at the conference meeting at Atlantic City in December." It was accordingly voted to "refer to the executive committee for study, consultation, and report, the question of how the city, county, and state secretaries can be given more responsibility for national program building and time schedules." John W. Harms was elected president and this writer vice-president in charge of the 1942 program.

Dr. J. Quinter Miller, reporting for the ICFD, pointed out the staff lists now printed in the Year Book of American Churches. The origins of what was later to be the Committee for Cooperative Field Research emerge irt a suggestion that the ICFD might make available survey and research field service.

Program personnel in 1941 included Dr. E. Stanley Jones (three addresses), Dr. Toyohika Kagawa (two addresses), and Dr. Chester S. Miao of China. In the light of the world situation the friendly re-

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Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Preface 9
  • Some Interdenomination Abbreviations 11
  • Chapter I- The American Scene 12
  • Reference Notes 28
  • Chapter II- The Sunday School Movement in the United States 31
  • Reference Notes 52
  • Chapter III- Federative Progress, 1900-1908 54
  • Reference Notes 75
  • Chapter IV- Shakedown Voyage, 1908-1915 77
  • Reference Notes 98
  • Chapter V- First Period of Expansion, 1915-1924 99
  • Reference Notes 123
  • Chapter VI- Appraisal and Testing, 1925-1931 125
  • Reference Notes 149
  • Chapter VII- The Merging Thirties 152
  • Reference Notes 179
  • Chapter VIII- The Expectant Forties 182
  • Reference Notes 204
  • Chapter IX- Since 1950, Solid Growth 205
  • Reference Notes 231
  • Chapter X- Meanings and Expectations 233
  • Reference Notes 252
  • Appendix I 259
  • Appendix II 262
  • Index 267
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