Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective

By Ross W. Sanderson | Go to book overview

REFERENCE NOTES

Chapter X
1
Saturday Review, April 23, 1959, from a talk at the dedication of the Colgate University Library. (The importance and the limitations of what happens at the United Nations Building may well serve as a restraining hand on extravagant claims of interdenominational progress, as well as a beacon toward ventures of co-operative effort yet to be undertaken.)
2
These figures are not exact: New York City has a number of councils; and some places are effectively served by councils in larger areas. However, the extent of the "unorganized" field is clear.
3
Ralph Canfield McAfee, long-time executive secretary ( Portland, Ore., Kansas City, Mo., and Detroit, Mich., councils) and urban church pastor, amending language submitted lo him by this writer; in a personal letter, February 24, 1959.
4
Two interfaith tendencies have been at work simultaneously. One, in the direction of greater mutual appreciation, has expressed itself in The National Conference of Christians and Jews, which soon swung away from its early FC moorings. The other has issued in movements like Protestants and Other Americans United.
5
Ecumenical Review, April, 1959, World Council Diary, p. 324.
6
At Minneapolis, 1926; FC Bulletin, January 1927.
7
W. W. Richardson, R. I., correspondent, The Christian Century, Nov. 4, 1959, p. 1292.
8
Op. cit., p. 251.
9
Also co-secretary of the 18th Ecumenical Student Conference of the National Student Christian Federation, held in Athens, Ohio, December 27, 1959, to January 2, 1960; in an article in The United Church Herald, January 21, 1960.
10
Introd. to Wm. B. Cate: "Theoretical and Practical Aspects of Ecumenical Communication", Ph. D. dissertation, Boston University, 1953. Introd., vi, 305 pp., and abstract.
11
United Church Herald, November 12, 1959, p. 3.
12
1869 Convention Report, p. 153.
13
Cited by Frank Mason North, in The Methodist Review, September-October, 1905.
15
Handy, op. cit, p. 28, citing "Cooperation in Home Missions" (undated).
18
Macfarland, Christian Unity in the Making, p. 182.
20
At times this was even at the expense of the prophetic, as "the price you pay for co-operation." ( J. M. Artman, in FC Bulletin, October, 1931, editorial.) From the standpoint of the objective sociologist, functional cooperation was a legitimate end in itself. In his influential book The Community ( Association Press, 1921), Dr. Artman had said, "Unfortunately, (church) federations have been largely nominal riot functional" (p. 165).
21
Cf. the hope expressed by one nationally influential churchman in 1951 that this history might help state and local councils to be something more than "errand boys of the denomination."
22
"From Missions to Mission" by Virgil A. Sly in his address before the DFM, NCC, December 7-10, 1958, in Pittsburgh. Printed in full in The Christian Evangelist-Front Rank, October 25, 1959, pp. 1352 ff.; cf. also Information Service, February 28, 1959. At the same DFM Assembly John Coventry

-252-

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Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Preface 9
  • Some Interdenomination Abbreviations 11
  • Chapter I- The American Scene 12
  • Reference Notes 28
  • Chapter II- The Sunday School Movement in the United States 31
  • Reference Notes 52
  • Chapter III- Federative Progress, 1900-1908 54
  • Reference Notes 75
  • Chapter IV- Shakedown Voyage, 1908-1915 77
  • Reference Notes 98
  • Chapter V- First Period of Expansion, 1915-1924 99
  • Reference Notes 123
  • Chapter VI- Appraisal and Testing, 1925-1931 125
  • Reference Notes 149
  • Chapter VII- The Merging Thirties 152
  • Reference Notes 179
  • Chapter VIII- The Expectant Forties 182
  • Reference Notes 204
  • Chapter IX- Since 1950, Solid Growth 205
  • Reference Notes 231
  • Chapter X- Meanings and Expectations 233
  • Reference Notes 252
  • Appendix I 259
  • Appendix II 262
  • Index 267
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