Global Benchmarks: Comprehensive Measures of Development

By Ophelia M. Yeung; John A. Mathieson | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
METHODOLOGY AND COUNTRY RATING SYSTEM

The name of the development web is based on the premise that the development progress of a country or region can be plotted on a hexagonal web. Each of the six axes on the web represents a different cluster, or vector, of development indicators; there is a separate vector for each of economic performance, competitiveness, education, health, environment, and democracy and freedom (see page 26). Progress in each development cluster is indicated on the corresponding vector on a scale from 1 to 100, with a score of 100 representing perfect performance. Thus the development progress of each country is depicted in its own web on a multidimensional scale. (See appendix A for a summary of the vector scores.)

Web scores for individual countries can be benchmarked against regional averages, the world average, or the scores of competitor countries to assess performance in each development category (see pages 27 and 28). Inferences can then be drawn as to whether a country is achieving "balanced" development or, alternatively, as to which development areas require more attention from policymakers and the development community. In addition, observations can be made about the development paths taken by different countries or groups of countries as they make progress on each vector.

As an objective measurement tool, the development web can be utilized by policymakers or donor organizations to assess a nation's progress vis-à-vis its neighbors or competitors. The web can also be used to track a country's development progress over time, as indicated by the expansion or contraction of the web.


SELECTION OF VARIABLES

A key element in the model design was the determination of the variables that constitute the six vectors. To the extent possible, the variables examined were quantitative and objectively measurable. For each vector, the following three-step process was carried out to make the indicator selection process objective and rigorous as possible (the chart on page 29 summarizes the selection process):

Step one is to, first, identify a "wish list" of optimal variables, assuming a world of perfect data availability, then identify all reputable sources of data. The wish list consists of those variables considered the most important and meaningful for measuring the achievement in a given development category.

-25-

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Global Benchmarks: Comprehensive Measures of Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter 1 a New Focus on Development 1
  • Chapter 2 the Development Web 9
  • Chapter 3 Research Background for Model Development 13
  • Chapter 4 Methodology and Country Rating System 25
  • SUMMARY 39
  • Chapter 5 Summary Findings 41
  • Chapter 6 Country Webs 79
  • Appendix A - SUMMARY OF VECTOR SCORES 283
  • Appendix B - WEIGHTED VECTOR SCORES 291
  • Appendix C SCORING SYSTEM FOR VECTORS 333
  • Appendix D WEIGHTING SYSTEMS FOR VECTORS 341
  • References 345
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