"What's in a Name?": (Tales, Historical or Fictitious, about 111 California Gold Belt Place Names)

By C. M. Goethe | Go to book overview

chase, the Monterey Cypress in its wild state has been saved from extinction. Simultaneously then has been preserved the locale of much early California history.

Some say Captain Castro and nine other soldiers won the ranch which contained Point Lobos and, incidentally, CARMELITO from the original Don. The doughty captain continued the play until his nine companions, one by one, lost their shares. Thus Castro was added to the names of the seraped, sombreroed, aristocratic haciendados of Alta California.

CARMELITO Point Lobos, the "Point of the Sea Wolves," was so named by the Spaniards. These included Cabrillo, Viscaneo, Portola, Father Serra, Anza. The whole Monterey area had a profound influence upon that part of California history recorded, particularly in the years between Bible Toter Jedediah Smith's explorations and Marshall's discovery of gold.

CARSON CREEK

WHAT'S IN A NAME? In CARSON CREEK'S, a dispute as to whether the gulch was named for its discoverer, supposedly a miner named Carson, or for the immortal Kit Carson himself.

The map is mottled with Freemason Kit's geography. If not CARSON CREEK we have Carson Pass, Carson City, Carson River, Carson Sink. Folktales wherein Kit is hero are almost as common as those about Daniel Boone, Davey Crockett, Buffalo Bill, Jim Bridger.

A sample may be given: In his later years Kit Carson found

-28-

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"What's in a Name?": (Tales, Historical or Fictitious, about 111 California Gold Belt Place Names)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page I
  • Dedication III
  • The '49ers XIII
  • Pioneer Leadership XIV
  • Foreword XV
  • Gold Rush Days' Chinese XVIII
  • List of Illustrations IXX
  • Amador City 1
  • Angel's Camp 2
  • Antelope 5
  • Brown's Valley 13
  • Brandy Flat 18
  • Butte City 20
  • Calico Mountains 22
  • Camptonville 24
  • Carmelito 25
  • Carson Creek 26
  • Cherokee (butte County) 28
  • Cherokee, (calaveras County) 30
  • Chile Gulch 33
  • Chinese Camp 35
  • Coloma 38
  • Coyote Diggings 50
  • Delirium Tremens 51
  • Donkeyville 52
  • Doty's Flat 55
  • Double Springs 57
  • Downieville 62
  • Eel River 65
  • Fiddletown 68
  • Folsom 71
  • Forbestown 72
  • Forest Hill Divide 74
  • Forest Home 77
  • Gold Run 81
  • Gouge-Eye 82
  • Grass Valley 85
  • Growlersburg 87
  • Hangtown 87
  • Hangtown "Fry" 88
  • Hangtown (deer Creek) 91
  • Humbug 91
  • Hundred-Ounce Gulch 92
  • Illinoistown 93
  • Jackass Hill 96
  • Jayhawk 96
  • Jesus Maria 98
  • Kentucky Slide 99
  • Liars' Flat 102
  • Lotus 104
  • Marysville 105
  • Michigan Bar 107
  • Michigan Bluff 111
  • Mokelumne Hill 112
  • Murphy's 120
  • Mad Mule Canyon, Whiskey Creek 124
  • Nevada City 127
  • One-Horse Town 128
  • Oroville 132
  • Paradise 133
  • Pinchemtight 134
  • Pokerville 137
  • Prairie City 139
  • Railroad Flat--Also Bummerville 140
  • Rattlesnake Bar 142
  • Rebel Hill 145
  • Red Dog 148
  • Rough and Ready 150
  • Shingle Springs 152
  • Sicord Flat (not "Sucker Flat") 152
  • Slumgullion 153
  • Smartsville 156
  • Sorefinger 159
  • Squaw Hollow 159
  • Sutter Creek 160
  • Sutter's Fort 162
  • Tiger Lily 164
  • Timbuctu 166
  • Tin Cup 174
  • Twenty-Mule-Team Canyon 175
  • Vallecito 177
  • Virginiatown 179
  • W. Y. O. D. 185
  • You-Be-Damned 187
  • Greeks and Forty-Niners 187
  • Glossary Of California Gold Belt Terms 190
  • Index 199
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