Between Peasant and Urban Villager: Italian-Americans of New Jersey and New York, 1880-1980: the Structures of Counter-Discourse

By Michael J. Eula | Go to book overview

PREFACE NOTES
1.
See such seminal studies as Samuel L. Baily's "The Adjustment of Italian Immigrants in Buenos Aires and New York, 1870-1914", American Historical Review, April 1983, pp. 281-305; Dino Cinel, From Italy to San Francisco: The Immigrant Experience ( Stanford, 1982); I. Rosenwaite , "Two Generations of Italians in America: Their Fertility Experience", International Migration Review, Fall 1973, especially page 275; John W. Briggs, "Fertility and Cultural Change among Families in Italy and America", American Historical Review, December 1986, pp. 1,129-1,145; Dennis J. Starr, The Italians of New Jersey: A Historical Introduction and Bibliography ( Newark, 1985); G. Monticelli, "Italian Emigration: Basic Characteristics and Trends with Special Emphasis on the Post-War Years", International Migration Review, Summer 1967, pp. 10-24; J. McDonald and L. McDonald, "Chain Migration, Ethnic Neighborhood and Social Network", Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly, 42, 1964, pp. 82-97; B. Cohler and H. Grunebaum, Mothers, Grandmothers and Daughters: Personality and Care in Three-Generation Families ( New York, 1981); and Nampeo R. McKenney, Michael Levin and Alfred J. Tella , "A Sociodemographic Profile of Italian Americans", in Italian Americans: New Perspectives in Italian Immigration and Ethnicity, ed. Lydio F. Tomasi ( New York, 1985), pp. 3-31.
2.
See Anthony L. LaRuffa's fine study in which he refers to the "ongoing" process of ethnicity. LaRuffa thoughtfully argues that "these traditional communities" are constantly reproducing "cultural phenomena" whose immediate historical origins are discernible in the Italian countryside. See Monte Carmelo: An Italian-American Community in the Bronx ( New York, 1988). Also see Marianna DeMarco Torgovnick's "On Being White, Female, and Born in Bensonhurst", in The Best American Essays, 1991, ed. Joyce C. Oates ( New York, 1991), pp. 223-235.
3.
Selections from the Prison Notebooks of Antonio Gramsci, eds. Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith ( New York, 1987), pp. 54-55. Also refer to C. Mouffe, ed., Gramsci and Marxist Theory ( London, 1979); Christine Buci-Glucksman, Gramsci and the State ( London, 1979); and my study, entitled "Gramsci's Views on Consent and its Basis as an Alternate Political Route", Differentia: Review of Italian Thought, Autumn

-xvii-

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