Growing Up Girls: Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity

By Sharon R. Mazzarella; Norma Odom Pecora | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Girlhood Pastimes: "American Girls" and the Rest of Us

Sarah Eisenstein Stumbar and Zillah Eisenstein

In this essay, my mom and I present a dialogue between ourselves about how it feels to be twelve and a girl, and a feminist author/ professor/mother in a culture dominated by boys and men. We agree about a lot but feel it differently sometimes. My mom (Zillah) says she learns a lot from me, and often I get her to change her mind about things. She sometimes gives the consumerist side of culture too much power. I remind her that I have a mind, and think things through in different ways than what is often expected. So when I wanted a Barbie I convinced her that I made Barbie into what I wanted her to be. She still did not get me a Barbie, but all her friends did.

I look at the American Girls Collection -- its books, dolls, games, and clothes, etc. -- as a fantastic exception to a boy-dominated world. The American Girls Collection creates a world of girls. Samantha, Molly, Felicity, Kirsten, Addy, and Josephina let me experience different historical periods from the dolls' viewpoint. Through their lives, experiences, dreams, parties, and disappointments I learn about colonial America, slave times, pioneer days, the early twentieth century, World War II and New Mexico's past.

It was great fun to explore these stories. They were a jumpingoff point for me to think more about girls who lived in time periods different from mine.

I wondered and was a little bothered that none of these girls was poor, except for Addy when she was a slave, but then even she becomes dazzlingly successful. And none of the girls is Jewish, or Muslim, or Korean, or Puerto Rican, like the girls in my school.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Up Girls: Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.