Growing Up Girls: Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity

By Sharon R. Mazzarella; Norma Odom Pecora | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Brown and Gilligan outline methods for discerning and interpreting the polyphony of voice in Meeting at the Crossroads. They also reference Mikhail Bakhtin 's The Dialogic Imagination (Trans Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist . Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981).
2
Since the interview reflects a relationship between the girls and video crew, I've described the setting and technical circumstances in this first encounter so that the girls' comments can be interpreted in context. Also, the presence of a camera and microphone always alter in some way the "reality" they are meant to record. All subsequent interviews excerpted in this essay were conducted under similar circumstances.
3
Ironically, while more established bands like L-7 and Hole defy limiting monikers such as "angry-women-in-rock," younger bands, like We're No Dentists, will inevitably be compared with them despite stylistic and often political differences.
4
Describing carnival, Bakhtin ( The Problems122-123) writes: "The laws, prohibitions, and restrictions that determine the structure and order of ordinary . . . life are suspended during carnival: what is suspended first of all is hierarchical structure. . . . that is, everything resulting from . . . inequality among people."
5
"Zines" are underground publications circulated mostly by mail to readers interested in a particular topic or subject. The zines Carly discusses, which are written and distributed by women, often include letters, artwork, and personal testimonies from readers. See also Stephen Duncombe's Notes from Underground: Zines and the Politics of Alternative Culture.

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