PREFACE

NO one can hope, or I think wish, to have read all that contemporaries wrote about art in the first three-quarters of the nineteenth century. I have seen much of the painting, sculpture, and architecture, but cannot claim that the survey is in any way complete. Many paintings, famous in their day, I have failed to trace, and the quest is none the easier from the changes that have taken place in their titles, the long Academy inscriptions being too lengthy for convenient reference. For this prolific and voluble period there are fortunately many guides. Since 1928, when Sir Kenneth Clark in his Gothic Revival blazed a new trail through what he described as 'these unmapped regions', nineteenth-century architecture has had many exponents and the names of Goodhart-Rendel, B.F.L. Clarke, Summerson, Betjeman, Pevsner, Colvin, and Hitchcock must be constantly had in grateful remembrance by any worker in this field. Mr. Rupert Gunnis in his Dictionary of Sculptors has made possible a reassessment of much that has been long forgotten. In painting the great names, Blake, Constable, Turner, the Pre-Raphaelites, have received detailed and often distinguished treatment: others await reinterpretation after the neglect into which they have too completely fallen.

Her Majesty the Queen has graciously permitted me to reproduce works in the Royal Collection. I trust that the Deans and Chapters, Trustees and Gallery Directors, corporate bodies and private owners who have allowed me to reproduce works in their possession will accept the acknowledgements in the list of plates as an expression of my most sincere thanks. Many of them have added to their kindness by sending photographs and information, allowing me most ready access, and bringing out from storage paintings not generally on exhibition. In particular the staffs of the Courtauld Institute, the National Buildings Record, the Bodleian Library, the Ashmolean Museum, the Print Room of the British Museum, and the Tate Gallery have shown the most kindly tolerance of the trouble I have constantly caused them. Over less

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Art, 1800-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates ix
  • List of Figures xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • I- Romanticism 1
  • II- Painters in Water-Colour 29
  • III- The Regency Style 65
  • IV- Turner and Constable 97
  • V- Statuary 128
  • VI- The Age of Wilkie 149
  • VII- The Battle of the Styles 176
  • VIII- State Patronage 203
  • IX- Restoration and Revival 223
  • X- The Great Exhibition 254
  • XII- Memorials, Portraits, And Photography 299
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.