IV
TURNER AND CONSTABLE

'THEN we all fell to talking about Turner', wrote T. S. Cooper ,1 recalling a dinner at the Athenaeum, 'and of his consummate knowledge of effect and colour, which, as we said, must stamp him amongst all artists and connoisseurs as one of the most original and finest painters that has lived in any age.' Maclise and Charles Turner, the engraver, were of the party: this was the estimate of brother artists and contemporaries, men who remembered the short, paunched, generally unkempt figure, preserved for us in many sketches, half truth, half caricature. He had a few friends, Fawkes of Farnley Hall, William Wells and his daughter Clara, George Jones, Munro of Novar, with whom he could relax into affectionate intimacy: he shared with Chantrey a liking for bluff humour and there was a bawdy streak that shocked Ruskin into the destruction of some of his franker drawings:2 but at the Ruskin's dinner table at Denmark Hill, at Petworth, or talking to Lady Eastlake he could be unaffectedly at ease and good company. Much of his life, however, was closely hidden: by a mistress, Sarah Danby, widow of a musician, he had a son and two daughters, and a Danby niece, Hannah, was the grim, slatternly, and loyal caretaker of his house in Queen Anne Street. At Ramsgate and later at Chelsea, Mrs. Booth looked after him, and he often passed as her husband. Mean and generous, loyal and secretive, his character was full of contradictions, and his vast, transforming imagination needed a certain animal squalor as part of its diet. Music and poetry meant much to him, he seems to have read widely and indiscriminately, but we have to disentangle his sources from the paintings themselves and the notes or verses he appended to them.3 Few artists have revealed so little about

____________________
5180.10 H
1
My Life ( 1891), 220.
2
W. M. Rossetti, Rossetti Papers, 1862-70 ( 1903), 383.
3
For a discussion of the seamier side of Turner's life see Bernard Falk, Turner the Painter: His Hidden Life ( 1938), where there is some new material in a book that aims

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Art, 1800-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates ix
  • List of Figures xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • I- Romanticism 1
  • II- Painters in Water-Colour 29
  • III- The Regency Style 65
  • IV- Turner and Constable 97
  • V- Statuary 128
  • VI- The Age of Wilkie 149
  • VII- The Battle of the Styles 176
  • VIII- State Patronage 203
  • IX- Restoration and Revival 223
  • X- The Great Exhibition 254
  • XII- Memorials, Portraits, And Photography 299
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.