V
STATUARY

THE pediments and porticoes of the Regency classical style demanded the co-operation of sculptors, and the stucco façades had their parallels in various compositions by which statuary could be provided both more cheaply and more durably than in stone. Of these coade stone was the most celebrated, a product whose supply and marketing was organized by Mrs. Eleanor Coade from her manufactory in Lambeth.1 She claimed that her stone 'had a property of resisting the frost and consequently of retaining that sharpness in which it excels every kind of stone sculpture'. Mrs. Coade herself died in 1796, but the firm continued in active production, first under her daughter, another Eleanor Coade, then under William Croggan and his son till 1836. Most of the sculptors of the day experimented at one time or other with this material, and much of their work has justified Mrs. Coade's claim. The statues on Sir John Soane's houses at Pitzhanger (Pl. 35 b) and Lincoln's Inn Fields or the great tympanum of the death of Nelson, designed by Benjamin West, on the west colonnade of Greenwich Hospital are singularly unweathered. Two of the artists particularly associated with these ornamental pieces were John Rossi and J. G. Bubb, who for a time (c. 1818), despite earlier quarrels, worked in partnership, using a kind of terracotta instead of the Coade patent. Bubb's pediments and friezes can still be seen in London and Bristol, particularly the great pediment of Cumberland Terrace and the much finer relief and statues on the Bristol Commercial Rooms. His main venture into monumental sculpture was not a happy one; when in 1806 he won the commission for Pitt's memorial in the Guildhall, it was generally held that the cheapness of his tender was the first consideration. It is an unsightly mass of figures that solidly survived the bombing of the hall. The Common Council of the City were not fortunate in their

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1
G. B. Hamilton in Arch. Rev. cxvi ( 1945), 295.

-128-

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English Art, 1800-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates ix
  • List of Figures xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • I- Romanticism 1
  • II- Painters in Water-Colour 29
  • III- The Regency Style 65
  • IV- Turner and Constable 97
  • V- Statuary 128
  • VI- The Age of Wilkie 149
  • VII- The Battle of the Styles 176
  • VIII- State Patronage 203
  • IX- Restoration and Revival 223
  • X- The Great Exhibition 254
  • XII- Memorials, Portraits, And Photography 299
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 331
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