Nationalism and Internationalism: Essays Inscribed to Carlton J. H. Hayes

By Edward Mead Earle | Go to book overview

THE NATIONALISM OF HORACE GREELEY

GLYNDON G. VAN DEUSEN

HORACE GREELEY was a nationalist.1 This was not the result of direct acquaintance with the nationalistic writings of Bolingbroke, Burke, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and Johann Gottfried von Herder. The eighteenth-century Enlightenment affected him more by its consequences than by the direct impact of its literature. Greeley's nationalism was due, in part, to the obvious fact that, like liberals, conservatives, romanticists, radicals, and all other specimens of the genus homo, he was born to a particular mood. The mysterious processes of generation produced in him a mentality susceptible to a nationalist view of things. The historian may note with more comfort, if not more certainty, that the nationalistic fervor of the Man in the White Coat derived largely from the influence of his environment and of the American tradition, and was strengthened and developed by his own restless search for a more perfect order of society.

The tradition that influenced Greeley's nationalism was of no ancient origin. There had been no full-fledged American nationalism in the colonial period, but even then its future development had been foreshadowed. Many colonial Americans had felt pride in their land and its people, and the belief had taken root that, as Jonathan Edwards expressed it, Providence meant America to be "the glorious renovator of the world."2 This pride in America was strengthened by the Revolution, and the consequent emergence of a new nation whose government was based upon the will of the people and their indefeasible, natural rights. Americans began to think that their country, by committing itself to such principles, had assumed a trusteeship for the liberty and happiness of Europe,

____________________
1
Greeley's nationalism is suggested in his Recollections of a Busy Life ( New York. 1868), and also by some of his early biographers. Its Importance to his career is partially indicated by Professor Earle D. Ross in the magazine articles hereafter cited.
2
Quoted in M. Curti, The Roots of American Loyalty ( New York, 1946), p. 3. My treatment of the background of Greeley's nationalism is based largely upon Curti's admirable work, as well as upon H. Kohn, The Idea of Nationalism ( New York, 1944). M. Savelle, Seeds of Liberty ( New York, 1948), has an excellent chapter entitled "Of Loyalties, and of the British-American Nation" on the genesis of American nationalism.

-431-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nationalism and Internationalism: Essays Inscribed to Carlton J. H. Hayes
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 514

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.