An Eighteenth Century Miscellany: The Classics of the Eighteenth Century Which Typify and Reveal an Era: Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, the Earl of Chesterfield, Laurence Sterne, Horace Walpole, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Edward Gibbon, William Blake

By Louis Kronenberger | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

By Mr. Colman


SPOKEN BY LADY TEAZLE

I, WHO was late so volatile and gay,
Like a trade-wind must now blow all one way,
Bend all my cares, my studies, and my vows,
To one dull rusty weathercock--my spouse!
So wills our virtuous bard--the motley Bayes
Of crying epilogues and laughing plays!
Old bachelors, who marry smart young wives,
Learn from our play to regulate your lives:
Each bring his dear to town, all upon her--
London will prove the very source of honour.
Plunged fairly in, like a cold bath it serves,
When principles relax, to brace the nerves:
Such is my case; and yet I must deplore
That the gay dream of dissipation's o'er.
And say, ye fair! was ever lively wife,
Born with a genius for the highest life,
Like me untimely blasted in her bloom,
Like me condemn'd to such a dismal doom?
Save money--when I just knew how to waste it!
Leave London--just as I began to taste it!

Must I then watch the early crowing cock,
The melancholy ticking of a clock;
In a lone rustic hall for ever pounded,
With dogs, cats, rats, and squalling brats surrounded?
With humble curate can I now retire,
(While good Sir Peter boozes with the squire,)
And at backgammon mortify my soul,
That pants for loo, or flutters at a vole.
Seven's the main! Dear sound that must expire,
Lost at hot cockles round a Christmas fire;
The transient hour of fashion too soon spent,
Farewell the tranquil mind, farewell content!
Farewell the plumed head, the cushion'd tête,
That takes the cushion from its proper seat!
That spirit-stirring drum!--card drums I mean,
Spadille--odd trick--pam--basto--king and queen!
And you, ye knockers, that, with brazen throat,
The welcome visitors' approach denote;
Farewell all quality of high renown,
Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious town!

-449-

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An Eighteenth Century Miscellany: The Classics of the Eighteenth Century Which Typify and Reveal an Era: Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, the Earl of Chesterfield, Laurence Sterne, Horace Walpole, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Edward Gibbon, William Blake
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • The Drapier's Letters to the People of Ireland - Against Receiving WOOD'S HALFPENCE 19
  • The Dunciad 103
  • The Beggar's Opera 145
  • Introduction 147
  • Letters to His Son 195
  • A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy 229
  • The Castle of Otranto a Gothic Story 307
  • PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION 309
  • PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION 312
  • The School for Scandal 383
  • PROLOGUE 388
  • EPILOGUE 449
  • Memoires of My Life and Writings 451
  • Songs of Innocence and Experience 551
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