The New Isolationism: A Study in Politics and Foreign Policy since 1950

By Norman A. Graebner | Go to book overview

8
Geneva: The Challenge That Failed

§1

Midway through 1955 two massive and converging forces promised to give American diplomacy greater flexibility and freedom than it had enjoyed in a decade. One train of influence stemmed directly from the conviction after the hydrogen bomb test of March, 1954, that the great nations of the world had an obligation to humanity to avoid another general war. The second impelling factor loomed from the American political scene -- the belief within the Republican Party that the time had arrived to free President Eisenhower, on whose popularity the party would depend in 1956, from all domestic pressures so that his diplomacy with the world might bring distinction to himself and his party. Together these powerful trends created the first major challenge since 1950 to the new isolationism as a significant force in American politics and foreign policy.

Few scientists, writers, and statesmen in 1955 still regarded war as a rational alternative to peace. The atomic age, they feared, had come too soon, for the leading nations were not yet reflecting the realities of nuclear destruction

-209-

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The New Isolationism: A Study in Politics and Foreign Policy since 1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Foundation: 1950 3
  • 2 - The Great Debate 32
  • 3 - The Price of Partisanship 60
  • 4 - Foreign Policy in '52 86
  • 5 - Eisenhower and the New Isolationism 112
  • 6 - In Lieu of Diplomacy 146
  • 7 - The Dilemma of Politics 183
  • 8 - Geneva: the Challenge That Failed 209
  • 9 - The Task of Leadership 239
  • Notes 265
  • Index 277
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