Military Crisis Management: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965

By Herbert G. Schoonmaker | Go to book overview

The priority placed on Power Pack combat elements by the Joint Chiefs delayed movement of required point-to-point communications equipment, thereby extending the operational periods of the airborne command post. Once communications personnel and equipment arrived the primary workload for command and control communications shifted to ground installations. The Air Force Communications Service sent personnel and equipment from three of its mobile communications groups to the Dominican Republic. These groups furnished mobile navigational aids, air traffic control service, and local and long-range communications. Communications Service technicians working with Bendix Corporation representatives installed an MRC- 98 tropospheric-scatter communication link between the Dominican Republic and Ramey AFB. This two hundred-mile communications link with multi-channel voice and teletype capabilities became operational early in May, connecting the Dominican objective area with Defense Communications System terminals in Puerto Rico. This system linked communications in the area of operations with a major worldwide long-range communications system. 25

Analysis of Dominican air operations indicates limitations in basic planning, procedural instructions, logistical support, and personnel resources. Nevertheless, the participating forces performed remarkably well in moving a complete army division in one week from the United States 1,200 miles to an airfield having very limited facilities in spite of poor weather conditions, large formations, minimum navigational aids, and grueling flight conditions. Once an airhead had been established, air support provided the ground forces with logistic and fighter and reconnaissance support, which, although limited by flight restrictions, adequately met ground force requirements.


NOTES
1.
U.S. Air Force, The Tactical Air Command in the Dominican Crisis, 1965 (Langley AFB, Va.: Office of TAC History, May 1977), p. 9.
2.
U.S. Air Force, TAC/OI, TAC-Its Story, 1971; "The Military Air Transport Service," Air Force and Space Digest ( September 1965), pp. 126-127; U.S. Air Force, OSAF, "Speaking of U.S. Air Force Operations in the Dominican Republic," Air Force Policy Letter for Commanders, No. 10-65, 15 May 1965; U.S. Air Force, TAC/OI, Press Release, OIO-P-65-242, 7 May 1965.
3.
ASI, "Air Force Role," pp. 9, 21; Airborne Ready Forces, Airborne Quarterly ( June-August 1965), p. 11; Ault, Dominican Republic Crisis p. 31; Robert F. Barry, ed., Power Pack ( Portsmouth,- N.H.: Messinger Printing Co., 1965), pp. 11, 24. The military designated the operation "Power Pack" because of the package concept inherent in army organization in 1965. The Reorganization Objective Army Divisions was the name given to the army's tactical reorganization designed to meet the requirements of flexible response. Under this reorganization each division had a fixed base including a

-74-

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Military Crisis Management: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Revolt and Response (24-27 April) 19
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - Decisions and Initial Operations (28-29 April) 33
  • Notes 42
  • 4 - Crisis Management 49
  • Notes 74
  • 6 - Military and Diplomatic Coordination (30 April-5 May) 77
  • Notes 92
  • 7 - Support Operations 97
  • Notes 106
  • 8 - Peace Force and Political Settlement (may 1965-Sept. 1966) 109
  • Notes 119
  • 9 - Conclusions 123
  • Bibliography 135
  • Index 145
  • About the Author 153
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