The U.S. Consul at Work

By William D. Morgan; Charles Stuart Kennedy | Go to book overview

2
Consular Leadership

The scope of this book covers roughly the period from the mid- 1960s through the present. One of the most dynamic and effective leaders during the early period was Barbara Watson, who served as administrator of the Bureau of Security and Consular Affairs from 1968 to 1974, and assistant secretary of consular affairs form 1977 to 1980. While the Bureau of Consular Affairs fortunately has been led by similarly strong and dedicated officials, Watson was noteworthy as an initiator and champion in the development of standards of leadership in consular officers. She also emphasized that to be a successful consular leader it was essential to have a keen political awareness of the role the consular function played in domestic and international affairs.

Unfortunately, there were not such clearly established and enumerated high standards of professional performance in previous decades. Adding to this lack of effective direction was the impression that consular work was considered - and in effect was - largely a clerical, highly technical, and uninspiring field of foreign affairs. As a result, over the years the specialty became the haven for a number of substandard Foreign Service employees, who were frustrated by their career limitations. The leadership of the Department of State, with its focus largely on the political and economic aspects of the diplomatic function, gave little direction to consular work. Uniformly high standards were not insisted upon for consuls.

Despite dramatic improvements in recent years in defining standards of leadership and professional development, there is still pressure within the Department of State to use consular positions as a haven for problem personnel. A U.S. court decision in 1989 underscored the realities of this

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The U.S. Consul at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction to the Consular Function 1
  • 2 - Consular Leadership 19
  • 3 - Leadership in the Field 29
  • 4 - The Role of Junior Officers 43
  • 5 - Professional Training 53
  • 6 - Foreign Service National Employees 61
  • 7 - The Embassy and the Consular Section 69
  • 8 - Consular Trade in International Politics 83
  • 9 - Communism and Consular Affairs 91
  • 10 Contemporary Management Technology 101
  • 11 - Relations with Congress 111
  • 12 - The American Community 121
  • 13 - Protection and Welfare 125
  • 14 - Other Citizenship Services 147
  • 15 - Anti-Narcotic Responsibilities 161
  • 16 - Anti-Fraud Responsibilities 167
  • 17 - The Visa Function 181
  • 18 - Refugee Programs 213
  • 19 - The Immigration and Naturalization Service 237
  • 20 - Seamen and Shipping 241
  • Glossary 247
  • About the Contributors 253
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.