The U.S. Consul at Work

By William D. Morgan; Charles Stuart Kennedy | Go to book overview

8
Consular Trade in International Politics

Consular officers abroad have frequent and direct contact with varied segments of the population of the host country. Consuls also deal with American citizens requiring assistance when they confront foreign laws and customs. Despite their insights into the local society, consular officers are too seldom involved in the overall political and economic analysis or reporting of the mission. In part, this is due to the work load pressure on the consular section, but also it is often the result of consuls' not exerting initiatives or senior mission leaders calling on them to take advantage of these opportunities.

Unfortunately, there is at times an attitude among FSO peers in other sections of an embassy that the consular function is so technical in nature that it rarely has any relationship with the overall diplomatic objectives of a mission or foreign affairs in general The diplomatic side of an embassy deals mainly with the top echelon of the host government in the capital (the ministries of foreign affairs, treasury, commerce and defense) as well as with the head of state. Consuls may deal with these too, but generally they find themselves working with the police, hospitals, municipal and judicial authorities removed from the capital, businesses, and private citizens. Despite this degree of separateness, in part historical, some post managers effectively use the contacts and insights of consular officers in overall mission reporting and analytical and representational objectives.

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The U.S. Consul at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction to the Consular Function 1
  • 2 - Consular Leadership 19
  • 3 - Leadership in the Field 29
  • 4 - The Role of Junior Officers 43
  • 5 - Professional Training 53
  • 6 - Foreign Service National Employees 61
  • 7 - The Embassy and the Consular Section 69
  • 8 - Consular Trade in International Politics 83
  • 9 - Communism and Consular Affairs 91
  • 10 Contemporary Management Technology 101
  • 11 - Relations with Congress 111
  • 12 - The American Community 121
  • 13 - Protection and Welfare 125
  • 14 - Other Citizenship Services 147
  • 15 - Anti-Narcotic Responsibilities 161
  • 16 - Anti-Fraud Responsibilities 167
  • 17 - The Visa Function 181
  • 18 - Refugee Programs 213
  • 19 - The Immigration and Naturalization Service 237
  • 20 - Seamen and Shipping 241
  • Glossary 247
  • About the Contributors 253
  • Index 257
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