The U.S. Consul at Work

By William D. Morgan; Charles Stuart Kennedy | Go to book overview

20
Seamen and Shipping

Of the varied segments of consular activities none has a deeper historical root than the protection of American shipping interests, especially as it concerns the individual sailors who run afoul of foreign laws or traditions. When the Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution, they knew well the need to protect principal U.S. overseas interests against the stronger and determined foreign powers and the dangers that beset small, seafaring countries. These interests were trade, commerce, and shipping - the core of the infant nation's very existence. These dangers included: Barbary Coast pirates, hijacking of U.S. ships (the War of 1812 and its causes), taking hostages for ransom, subhuman conditions of imprisonment of U.S. sailors, bribery by officials, and venality of American shipping interests. Only the U.S. consul in foreign lands could intervene effectively to demand U.S. rights of fair trade or to defend a sailor's rights to humane treatment when imprisoned.

As Chapter 1 outlines, the following two centuries of U.S. history depict the needs and importance of U.S. power in the maritime world. Here again, U.S. consuls intervened with ship masters on behalf of maltreated sailors or tried to settle disputes between labor and management. But after World War II as the United States became less influential in commercial shipping; so did the demands on consular officers to play these historic roles. At the same time, modern management techniques - and labor union effectiveness - saw the remaining shipping firms better prepared to protect the rights of their employees and to settle specific difficulties encountered directly with foreign governments.

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The U.S. Consul at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction to the Consular Function 1
  • 2 - Consular Leadership 19
  • 3 - Leadership in the Field 29
  • 4 - The Role of Junior Officers 43
  • 5 - Professional Training 53
  • 6 - Foreign Service National Employees 61
  • 7 - The Embassy and the Consular Section 69
  • 8 - Consular Trade in International Politics 83
  • 9 - Communism and Consular Affairs 91
  • 10 Contemporary Management Technology 101
  • 11 - Relations with Congress 111
  • 12 - The American Community 121
  • 13 - Protection and Welfare 125
  • 14 - Other Citizenship Services 147
  • 15 - Anti-Narcotic Responsibilities 161
  • 16 - Anti-Fraud Responsibilities 167
  • 17 - The Visa Function 181
  • 18 - Refugee Programs 213
  • 19 - The Immigration and Naturalization Service 237
  • 20 - Seamen and Shipping 241
  • Glossary 247
  • About the Contributors 253
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.