A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government

By Wilfred E. Binkley; Malcolm C. Moos | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE ONLY justification for another book on American Government and Politics would seem to be a somewhat different interpretation of that field of knowledge. We have assumed that it is time to square off and take another look at our governmental system and in that way attempt to free ourselves from some of the generalizations, abstractions, and conventional fictions that so often obscure a clear view of the realities of American Government.

A basic assumption in preparing this book has been that, without sacrificing essential factual matter, it would be possible to interpret the phenomena of American Government in terms of human motivation. It has, therefore, been our persistent purpose to discover those human interests and ideologies that account for the civic conduct of both private citizens and public officials.

No scholar aided us more in the maturing of this work than V. O. Key, Jr., formerly Chairman of the Department of Political Science of The Johns Hopkins University, and now Alfred Cowles Professor of Government, Yale University. Every chapter has been improved as a consequence of his patient and vigilant reading of successive drafts, and this we gratefully acknowledge.

The chapters on the judiciary were read by former Attorney General of the United States Francis Biddle, whose suggestions led to improvements gratefully acknowledged. Curtis E. Johnson of Washington, D. C., gave us the benefit of his intimate knowledge of Congress as a one-time secretary of a member of the House of Representatives. There has been frequent consulting of an accumulation of the digests of articles and of the reports of assigned investigations made by students of Ohio Northern University and of the Advanced School of Education of Teachers College, Columbia University.

Grateful acknowledgment goes to the following: George Grassmuck, Junior Instructor in Political Science at The Johns Hopkins University,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 789

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.