Perspectives on English: Essays to Honor W. Wilbur Hatfield

By Robert C. Pooley | Go to book overview

PREFACE
THROUGHOUT the length and breadth of the land English is taught in the high schools five days a week for four years. It was not always so, and the story of the attainment of English into the pivotal place in the secondary curriculum which it now occupies is a fascinating one. Regardless of the criticisms expressed today about many aspects of English instruction and the outcomes of such instruction, few critics would reduce the time now devoted to the subject. It has been estimated that today the English course of study contains twenty-odd areas ranging from grammar (the first area to be taught) to TV appreciation. Each area had to justify itself before becoming generally accepted, and even today controversy is still carried on over some of them.Only one area will be considered in this paper--that of teaching literature--itself a topic of debate for almost a century or more. We shall draw a distinction between the teaching of reading and the teaching of literature appreciation and understanding. The former has been well handled in numerous monographs and treatises as part of the history of methodology in reading. We shall be concerned with some of the following aspects:
1. What was the nature of the literature studied?
2. What types of textbooks were utilized?
3. What methods of teaching were employed?
4. When and where courses in literature were introduced into the high school course?

Our study must of necessity be limited in the number of schools to be studied. Finney states that between 1861 and 1890, the founda-

JOSEPH MERSAND Chairman of the English department, Jamaica High School, Jamaica, New York. Formerly curriculum co-ordinator, academic high schools, New York City; Principal, James K. Paulding Junior High School. President NCTE, 1958-1959. Chairman, Committee on the Playlist, NCTE. Chairman, editorial board for Guide to Play Selection, second edition, 1958. Author of Chaucer's Romance Vocabulary, 1939; Traditions in American Literature, 1939; American Drama, 1930-1940, 1941; American Drama since 1930, 1949. Author and coauthor of texts in language and literature and contributor to numerous journals.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on English: Essays to Honor W. Wilbur Hatfield
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.