A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government

By Wilfred E. Binkley; Malcolm C. Moos | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI N0MINATING PROCEDURES

The fundamental principle of a republic is individual responsibility. The responsibility is personal at the point in our political system where the citizen comes in direct contact with the system itself. . . . But this ends with the adjournment of the primary or caucus. From that moment the citizen, in a representative democracy, under a caucus, delegate, and convention system, does not again come in direct personal touch with the work of either legislation or administration. How essential, then, if he is to be a factor in government, that he take part, and intelligently too, in this fundamental work. If there be failure here, there is failure throughout. If the minority control in the caucuses, the laws will be made and executed by the agent of the minority, and the first principle of government fails." Speech of Robert M. LaFollette at the University of Chicago on Washington's Birthday, 1897.

BY FAR the most important function of political parties is that of selecting candidates for public elective office. Political parties do, to be sure, serve the processes of government in several ways other than by nominating candidates. They provide the vehicle for uniting people holding similar views on political principles and policies, they have an educational function in familiarizing the electorate with the issues, and they perform the very practical service of carrying on campaigns. Each of these functions, however, might also be undertaken by pressure groups that desire to influence national policies on their own initiative. But in so far as the nomination of candidates for election to public office is concerned, the political party is sovereign.

That some method of narrowing down the number of candidates from whom the electorate may make a choice is a necessary requisite under our form of government seems fairly obvious. The idea of direct election of public officials without any intervening nominative process is conceivable in an extremely small community or constituency, but the principle can hardly be applied say, in a congressional district, the average size of which runs around 300,000 people. It seems only natural therefore that the num-

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 789

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.