The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature

By Margaret R. Scherer | Go to book overview

LIST OF PLATES

INTRODUCTION
Fig. 1. Fragment of a Tabula Iliaca with scenes from the Trojan War. Roman relief, perhaps first century A.D. Rome, Capitoline Museum. Photo: Alinari.
Fig. 2. Jason, Hercules, and their companions set out to destroy Troy for the first time. Page from a manuscript of Lydgate Troy Book, English, third quarter of the fifteenth century. Manchester, John Rylands Library. Ryl. Eng. No. 1. Photo: John Rylands Library.
Fig. 3. The rape of Helen. Italian mailoica dish ( Urbino), 1540- 1550, after an engraving of the School of Marcantonio, perhaps from a design by Raphael. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo: Metropolitan Museum.
Fig. 4. Title and end page of two chapbooks of the History of Hector, Prince of Troy. London, 1728- 1769. New York, Pierpont Morgan Library. Photo: Morgan Library.

BEFORE THE ILIAD
1. Attic blacked-figured volute krater: The FranÇois vase. Sixth century B.C. Florence, Museo Archeologico, No. 4209. Photo: Alinari.
2. The marriage of Peleus and Thetis: The Gods visit the newly-wedded pair. Shoulder band on the François vase. Photo: Soprintendenza alle Antichità d'Etruria, Florence.
3. The Gods bring gifts to Peleus and Thetis. Relief on a Roman sarcophagus. Rome, Villa Albani. Photo: Alinari.
4. The Goddess of Discord throws the apple on the table at the wedding feast of Peleus. Detail of a painted ceiling, 1377- 1380. Palermo, Palazzo Chiaramonte. From Gabrici and Levi, Lo Steri di Palermo, Milan, Rome (n.d.).
5. Discord at the wedding feast of Peleus and Thetis. Illustration by Jean Mielot from a manuscript of Christine de Pisan Épître d'Othéa, Déesse de la Prudence, à Hector, Chef des Troyens, 1461. Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale, MS.fr.9392, fol.63v. Photo: Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale.
6. The feast of Peleus. Painting, 1872- 1881, by Sir Edward Burne-Jones. Birmingham, City Museum and Art Gallery. Photo: Birmingham City Museum.
7. The judgment of Paris. Attic white-ground pyxis, 465-460 B.C. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 07.286.36. Photo: Metropolitan Museum.
8. The judgment of Paris. Roman wall painting from Pompeii, first century A.D. Naples, National Museum. Photo: Alinari-Anderson.
9. The judgment of Paris: at the left the three Graces. Relief on a niche of the stage of the theatre at Sabratha, Leptis Magna, North Africa. Roman, second or third century A.D. Photo: Soprintendenza Monumenti e Scavi, Libya.
10. The judgment of Paris as a dream. From a late- fifteenth-century manuscript of Raoul Lefèvre Recueil des Histoires de Troie. Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale, MS.fr.22552, fol.214v. Photo: Bibliothèque Nationale.
11. The judgment of Paris. Early fifteenth-century Italian painting. Florence, Museo Nazionale. Photo: Alinari.
12. The judgment of Paris. Engraving, about 1510, by Marcantonio Raimondi, after a design by Raphael. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo: Metropolitan Museum.
13. The judgment of Paris and the return of the Goddesses to Olympus. Front of a Roman sarcophagus, probably second century A.D. Rome, Villa Medici. Photo: Alinari.
14. The judgment of Paris. Painting, about 1528, by Lucas Cranach the Elder. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo: Metropolitan Museum.
15. The judgment of Paris. Painting, 1635- 1636, by Peter Paul Rubens. London, National Gallery. Photo: National Gallery.
16. The judgment of Paris. Painting, about 1915, by Pierre Auguste Renoir. Germantown, Collection of Henry P. McIlhenny. Photo: Courtesy Duveen Art Galleries with permission of owner.
17. Prelude to the first capture of Troy: Laomedon forbids Jason and Hercules to land for provisions. Franco- Flemish tapestry, late fifteenth century. Omaha, Joslyn Art Museum, Photo: Courtesy French and Company with permission of owner.
18. Priam rebuilding Troy. From a late- fifteenth-century manuscript of Raoul Lefèvre Recueil. Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale. MS.fr.22552, fol.206v. Photo: Bibliothèque Nationale.
19. Helen. Fragment of an Attic white-ground krater

-279-

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The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Before the Iliad 1
  • The Iliad 55
  • The Fall of Troy 95
  • The Oresteia 131
  • The Odyssey 141
  • The Aeneid 181
  • Appendices - A Partial List of Works of Literature and Music And A Selection of Works of Art 217
  • Notes 255
  • List of Plates 279
  • Index of Mythological Personages And Places 287
  • General Index 295
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