The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature

By Margaret R. Scherer | Go to book overview

INDEX OF MYTHOLOGICAL PERSONAGES AND PLACES
Names of most personages are entered under their most common forms, often latinized Greek, other forms being given in parentheses, as Ajax ( Aias), Aphrodite ( Cypris, Venus). Latin forms are used in romances, as Jupiter for Zeus, Minerva for Athena.
Achates, companion of Aeneas, 185, 187
Acheron, river of Hades, deity of, 166
Achilles (Achilleus), son of Peleus and Thetis, birth prophesied, 57 fated to die if he fights at Troy, 57
Thetis attempts to make him invulnerable, 40
in Scyros, 43
kills Tenes, son of Apollo, 49, 99
kills Teuthras, king of Mysia, 51 and Note
takes Chryseis captive, 58
is given Briseis as share of plunder, 59
anger at Agamemnon, 58-61
surrenders Briseis to Agamemnon, 59
withdraws from battle because of anger at Agamemnon, 59 withdraws from battle because of love for
Polyxena, 59
refuses to return to battle, 70, 102
lends Patroclus his armour, 72
mourns death of Patroclus, 74f.
armour made for by Hephaestus, 75-77
shield of, 77f.
his horse prophesies his master's death, 75
is challenged to single combat by Hector, 81 ff.
pursues Hector about Troy's walls, 84ff.
kills Hector, 86f.
death of, prophesied by Hector, 86
drags Hector's body, 88
sees spirit of Patroclus, 89
slays Trojan captives at funeral of Patroclus, 90
gives Priam Hector's body, 91f.
sees Polyxena early in war, 53
sees and loves Polyxena late in war, 59,98f.
kills Troilus, 4,53,102
kills Penthesilea, loves her, 96ff.
kills Memnon, 99
killed by Paris, 99
shade of demands sacrifice of Polyxena, 124f.
in the White Island, 99
in the Fields of the Blessed, 102
shade of seen by Odysseus, 102, 165
son of given his father's arms, 104
Aeaea, island of Circe, see Circe's island
Aegisthus, lover of Clytemnestra, cousin of Agamemnon,
part in slaying of Agamemnon, 132ff.
killed by Orestes, 135ff.
Aeneas, Trojan noble, son of Aphrodite and Anchises,
founding of Roman Empire traced to, 182
helps Paris to steal Helen, 29,31
destined to rule the Trojans, 182
treachery toward Troy, 108, 182
dissuaded by Aphrodite from killing Helen, 190
escapes from Troy with his family, 190ff.
saves the true Palladium, 190
loses his wife during escape, 190
reaching Crete is told to seek Italy, 194f.
at the Harpies' island, 195
sights Italy, 196
visits Andromache and Helenus at Epirus, 130, 196
visits land of the Cyclops, 196
stops at Drepanum, 196
ships driven ashore by storm on African coast, 184f.
welcomed by Dido at Carthage, 187f.
feasted by Dido, 187f.
relates the fall of Troy, 188ff.
goes hunting with Dido, 196
shelters with Dido from storm, 196f.
leaves Carthage, 200
stops on Sicilian coast; women burn ships, 204
seeks the Cumaean Sibyl, 204
visits the Underworld, 205f.
told by his father's spirit of future Rome, 206f.
leaves the Underworld, 210
lands at Latium, his destined goal, 211
arouses jealousy of Turnus, 211
makes alliance with Evander, who shows him the site of Rome, 211
receives from Venus armour made by Vulca n, 212f.
makes alliance with Etruscans, 213
kills Turnus, 215
founds Lavinium, 182,215
marries Lavinia, 215
deified, 215
adventures passed over in main body of Troy romance, 183-194
Aeolus, god of the winds, 158, 184

-287-

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The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Before the Iliad 1
  • The Iliad 55
  • The Fall of Troy 95
  • The Oresteia 131
  • The Odyssey 141
  • The Aeneid 181
  • Appendices - A Partial List of Works of Literature and Music And A Selection of Works of Art 217
  • Notes 255
  • List of Plates 279
  • Index of Mythological Personages And Places 287
  • General Index 295
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