A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government

By Wilfred E. Binkley; Malcolm C. Moos | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

CONSTITUTIONALLY, the president is named as the head of the executive branch. Yet in electing a president the voters are not merely electing the top executive officer of the Federal government. In a sense they are electing a national legislative representative, for although the president holds no membership in the legislature--the Congress--he has by custom and practice gradually emerged as a person intimately connected with the formation of legislative policy in the United States. A person voting for a congressman secures local representation, and to the extent that the representative serves the national welfare, the people, taken collectively, might be said to have a national representative. But neither an individual congressman or the Speaker of the House of Representatives is elected by a majority of the voters of the United States; hence, even though they may strive to serve national rather than local interests they are certainly not elected by means of a national referendum. If then any public official may be said to represent the people nationally, it is the president, for he is the only public official whose election depends upon voters in every state of the union.


THE PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

The quadrennial election of a president is the one occasion upon which the political machinery scattered throughout the United States is temporarily confederated for a supreme effort. At this time the major party labels pull together many discordant elements within each party, and except in unusual cases the factual disputes within the parties are momentarily soft-pedalled. In some instances, of course, dissenting elements within a party have refused to go along. Thus certain disgruntle Democrats protested the nomination of President Truman in 1948 and the civil rights program adopted by the Democratic convention by forming

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Grammar of American Politics: The National Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 789

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.