The Second International, 1889-1914

By James Joll | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
THE STUTTGART RESOLUTION

MILITARISM AND INTERNATIONAL CONFLICTS

'The Congress confirms the resolutions of previous International Congresses against militarism and imperialism and declares anew that the fight against militarism cannot be separated from the socialist class war as a whole.

'Wars between capitalist states are as a rule the result of their rivalry for world markets, as every state is not only concerned in consolidating its own market, but also in conquering new markets, in which process the subjugation of foreign lands and peoples plays a major part. Further, these wars arise out of the never-ending armament race of militarism, which is one of the chief implements of bourgeois class-rule and of the economic and political enslavement of the working classes.

'Wars are encouraged by the prejudices of one nation against another, systematically purveyed among the civilized nations in the interest of the ruling classes, so as to divert the mass of the proletariat from the tasks of its own class, as well as from the duty of international class solidarity.

'Wars are therefore inherent in the nature of capitalism; they will only cease when capitalist economy is abolished, or when the magnitude of the sacrifice of human beings and money, necessitated by the technical development of warfare, and popular disgust with armaments, lead to the abolition of this system.

'That is why the working classes, which have primarily to furnish the soldiers and make the greatest material sacrifices, are natural enemies of war, which is opposed to their aim: the

-196-

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The Second International, 1889-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • The Socialist World In 1889 4
  • [ii] - The Founding Of The Second International 30
  • III - The Struggle With the Anarchists 56
  • IV - Reformism And Revisionism 77
  • V - Socialism And Nationalism 106
  • VI - The Bells of Basle 126
  • VII - Summer 1914 158
  • VIII - Conclusion 184
  • Appendix - The Stuttgart Resolution 196
  • Select Bibliography 199
  • Index 206
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