Oratorical Culture in Nineteenth-Century America: Transformations in the Theory and Practice of Rhetoric

By Gregory Clark; S. Michael Halloran | Go to book overview

Afterword

Gregory Clarkand S. Michael Halloran

In Nineteenth-Century Rhetoric in North America, Nan Johnson argues that "an account of the nature of the 19th century rhetorical tradition implies an investigation of the philosophical assumptions, theoretical models, and cultural mandates that shaped 19th century theory and practice" ( 1991, 7). The perspective developed in this collection of essays supports that argument but with a significant modification: Philosophy and theory are not, in our view, of the same order as "cultural mandates" but are rather manifestations of culture, perhaps epiphenomena of deeper cultural forces. Together these essays attempt to demonstrate how changes in the theory and practice of rhetoric can be understood in the larger context of cultural change.

Read in terms of the historiographical notion of transformation developed in our introductory essay, these essays also attempt to show that while rhetoric continued to function throughout the nineteenth century as public discourse -- that is, as a means of constructing and enacting citizenship -- the nature of the American public(s) changed. And so, consequently, did the forms and forums of rhetoric, in ways that problematize the very idea of "public discourse." We will return to question of what is to count as public discourse, but first we must turn once more to theoretical language provided by Kenneth Burke.

In A Grammar of Motives, Burke defines transformation as referring to "a qualitative shift in the nature of motivation" that occurs through the process of changing identifications ([ 1945] 1969, 357). In A Rhetoric of Motives, he notes that such changes in identification often occur when "a specific activity makes one a participant in some social or economic class" ([ 1950] 1969, 28). The example he delights in using is the shepherd who cares for the sheep: "The shepherd, qua shepherd, acts for the good of the sheep, to protect them from discomfiture and harm. But he may be 'identified' with a project that is raising the

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oratorical Culture in Nineteenth-Century America: Transformations in the Theory and Practice of Rhetoric
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.