Amid the Fall, Dreaming of Eden: Du Bois, King, Malcolm X, and Emancipatory Composition

By Bradford T. Stull | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Amid the Fall, Dreaming of Eden has not one root but many. William A. Covino and David Jolliffe: the handful of bibliographic entries I wrote for their text on rhetoric served as the germinative work for this book. Indiana University East: its generous summer research grant provided me with three months of compositional freedom; its extraordinary library staff energized me with their passion for research and scholarship and their dedication to service. Stephen Webb, Patricia Bizzell, William A. Covino, Sharon Dean, and Paul Lizotte: each read portions of this book as it was being written and revised, and honestly cared. Tracy Sobol and John Gehner, my former and current editor at Southern Illinois University Press: Tracy saw this book's potential and patiently set it on its way; with professionalism John continued from where Tracy ended. The students in English Language-Development and Issues, at Rivier College: they participated in fecund discussions about cultural literacy and Cultural Literacy, discussions central to this project. Southern Illinois University Press readers: they chipped the edges, firmed the core. Michael Birkel: throughout the writing of this book, he served as a model Quaker scholar. Elias Stull Kim and Maggie Kim: together, they are the taproot.

-xi-

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Amid the Fall, Dreaming of Eden: Du Bois, King, Malcolm X, and Emancipatory Composition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 Emancipatory Composition 1
  • Chapter 2 The Fall 21
  • Chapter 3 The Orient 48
  • Chapter 4 Africa 74
  • Chapter 5 Eden 99
  • Chapter 6 Conclusion 120
  • Notes 129
  • Works Cited 139
  • Index 143
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