The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

"A few Things that may be of some Use"

[Here first printed, from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "Negro Child" was the child of a slave belonging to Franklin. Joseph Choate was a colonel in the Massachusetts regiment raised for the expedition against Louisburg in 1745. Jane Mecom's first grandchild, whose name is not known and who died an infant, was the child of Edward Mecom Jr., married on July 22, 1755, to Ruth Whittemore. Boston Registry Records, xxx (Marriages 1752- 1809), 369, gives his name as Edward Macomb.]

Philada June 10. 1756

DEAR SISTER,

We wrote to you per Capt. Morton who sailed yesterday, & sent you a few Things that may be of some Use perhaps in your Family. I hope, tho' not of much Value, they will be acceptable. Inclos'd is an Acct of Particulars, and the Captain's Receipt, with the Key of the Trunk.

Our Family is well. The Small Pox is beginning in Town by Inoculation, but has not otherwise spread as yet; those who have been inoculated not being yet in the ripe state to communicate Infection. We have only a Negro Child to have it.

Pray let me know by a Line whether you did not some Months ago receive a Pacquet from me for Col. Choate, & whether he has got it. My Respects to him, & to all Friends. With Love to Br. Mecom & your Children, I am, Dr Sister

Your affectionate

Brother

B FRANKLIN

I congratulate you on the Birth of a Grandchild


"Unsettledness of Temper"

[Printed first in Sparks, Familiar Letters, pp. 40-43, and here more correctly from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. William Strahan was already Franklin's friend and correspondent in London.]

New York, June 28. 1756

DEAR SISTER

I received here your Letter of extravagant Thanks, which put me in mind of the Story of the Member of Parliament,

-52-

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