The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

their noses as if they smelt a stink; at the same time that they eagerly snuff up an empty canting harangue, as if it was a posey of the choicest flowers: so they have inverted the good old verse, and say now

A man of deeds and not of words
Is like a garden full of

I have forgot the rhyme, but remember 'tis something the very reverse of perfume. So much by way of commentary. My wife will let you see my letter, containing an account of our travels, which I would have you to read to sister Douse, and give my love to her. I have no thoughts of returning till next year, and then may possibly have the pleasure of seeing you and yours --take Boston in my way home.

My love to brother and all your children, concludes at this time from,

Dear jenny,

Your affectionate brother,

B. FPANKLIN


"Our Grandfather Peter Foulger"

[Printed first in Goodman, A Benjamin Franklin Reader, pp. 751- 752, and here more correctly from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Attleborough is in Norfolk, not in Suffolk, and near Norwich, from which Peter Folger came to Massachusetts about 1635. The "Germantown Affair" was a plan to manufacture glass with the aid of imported German glassblowers at a point in Boston Harbor in what is now Quincy. John Franklin was one of the proprietors in the company, and Peter Franklin, though not a proprietor, seems to have been interested in it. Benjamin Franklin had built two "tenements," small wooden houses, there, which he had bequeathed, in his will of April 28, 1757, to his nephew James Franklin of Newport. For an account of the undertaking, and its failure, see William S. Pattee, A History of Old Braintree and Quincy ( Quincy, 1878), pp. 473- 483. Franklin had read in Cotton Mather Magnalia Christi Americana of William Laud, archbishop of Canterbury, and of Thomas Mayhew, patentee and first governor of Martha's Vineyard and missionary to the Indians there. Abisha Folger of Nantucket was a grandnephew of Franklin's mother.]

-68-

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