The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

about Presbyterians, and Affronts, might possibly give more Offence, and so I threw it by, concluding not to send it. However, Mr. Bailey calling on me, and having no other Letter ready nor time at present to write one, I venture to send it, and beg you will excuse what you find amiss in it. I send also by Mr Bailey the Cloak mention'd in it, and also a Piece of Linnen, which I beg you to accept of from

Your loving Brother

BF.

I recd your Letter, & Benny's & Peter's by Mr Bailey, which I shall answer per next Opportunity.


Jane Mecom to Deborah Franklin

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. In the Pennsylvania Gazette for March 6, 1760, William Dunlap , a cousin of Deborah Franklin, advertised for sale A Letter to the People of Pennsylvania: occasioned by the Assembly's passing that important Act for constituting the Judges of the Supreme Court and Common Pleas, during Good Behaviour. "Cousen Holmes" was William Homes , son of Jane Mecom's dead sister Mary Homes. "Beney & Betsey" were Benjamin Mecom and his wife Elizabeth. They then had at least one daughter, named Sarah, who had been baptized on October 1, 1758. The Manifesto Church. Records of the Church in Brattle Square Boston 1699-1872, Boston, 1902, p. 178, which gives the name of the mother as Elizabeth Mecom but does not mention the father. On February 9, 1761, Benjamin Mecom wrote his aunt Deborah Franklin that he had another daughter, Deborah, baptized five weeks before. There was a third, Abiah, whose name does not appear among Boston baptisms and who may have been born after the family left for New York. A fourth, Jane, seems to have been born about 1765. Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, p. 4. And by May 20, 1768, there was a fifth, whose name is not known but who was presumably among the "five Dafters" mentioned by Deborah Franklin in a letter of that date to her husband. "Litle Ben," who had apparently been mentioned in a letter from Deborah Franklin, has not been identified. "Jeney Mecom," who seemed to be "going the same way of her father & sister," is a mystery. If "Beney & Betsey . . . with all there famely" were well, this could not have been a daughter of theirs. Nor does it seem possible that the reference could have been to Jane Mecom's

-73-

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