The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Jane Mecom to Deborah Franklin

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The child that had died was Mary (Polly) Flagg, about the beginning of March according to Jane Mecom "Book of Ages." The other child was Josiah Flagg, born November 12, 1760, lamed for life by a fall in his fifth year. Still another Flagg child, Sarah, had died on November 9, 1764, "aged 17 months." The father, William Flagg, had apparently hurt his arm in some accident. The ailing dependent elsewhere called "Poor Sarah" was the "my Sarah" here mentioned. By "cousin Sally" Jane Mecom meant her niece Sarah Franklin. The Polly who held "beter but far from well" was Mary Mecom, then seventeen.]

Apr 6--1765

DEAR SISTER

I have yrs of March 5th & Recd the magizeen for which I thank you, I have brewed the spruce Bear twice & have Reason to think it is Good in the case you were so Good as to care for, Polly holds beter but far from well. the sick child I mentioned to you in my Last Died the next Day, & the other childs Knee grows worce, the fathers Arm Grows beter but is so weak He cant Lift it to His Head nor Do the Least thing & my Sarah has keept her bed Ever since Ecxep 2 or 3 Days she has sat up in a chare about 2 Hours so that my mind is keept in a contineual Agitation that I Dont know how to write. we have Grat Joy with you at the News of our Brothers arival in England tho we know it no other way than by that smal line in the News Paper there is two Ships Arived hear from London since & not a word of Him.

Pray Remember my Love to cousin Sally & Brother Peter & wife, & Exept the same yr self from yr Loving sister


JANE MECOM

"The Use of my Arm"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Edward Mecom, to whom Franklin sent his love, died on September 11, 1765, before this letter could reach his widow.]

-82-

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