The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

London, Augt 29. 1765.

DEAR SISTER,

It pains me that I have so long omitted writing to you;--and I do not complain that it is so long since I have been favour'd with a Line from you: for being so bad a Correspondent my self, I have no right to complain of others.--Indeed I have so many and such long Letters to write, which I cannot dispense with, that I am forc'd to trespass on the Goodness of such Friends as I trust will be kind enough to make some Allowance for me; as my writing Work really grows heavy on me, & hurts my Health by confining me too much, & preventing my taking proper Exercise.

How have you done since I last heard from you, & how is it with your Family?--I have pretty well recover'd the Use of my Arm, and think it may in time be as strong as ever. Give my Love to Brother Mecom & your Children. I can now only add, that I am, as ever,

Your affectionate Brother
I purpose writing to my
Cousin Williams & other B FRANKLIN
Boston Friends shortly

Jane Mecom to Deborah Franklin

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "Grat Pope" was Alexander Pope, whose work Jane Mecom more than once mentioned in her letters. The "four Near & Dear Relations" whom Jane Mecom had lost in "fiveteen months" were her daughter Sarah Flagg, on June 12, 1764; Sarah's two daughters, Sarah on November 9, 1764, and Mary early in March 1765; and now Edward, Jane Mecom's husband, September 11. It was the Reverend Samuel Cooper of the Brattle Street Church who preached a special sermon for his bereaved parishioner and comforted her with the thought that even "Pall" (St. Paul) had suffered many afflictions.]

Boston Sept 28 1765

DEAR SISTER

Nothing but troble can you hear from me but I do my Endevour to adopt the Grat Popes Doctrin with Regard to the Providence

-83-

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