The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Ladys sett the Example. as they are Just come on Shore I have had no Opertuni [t]y yet to know what Incuridgment we are Like to have, but could not Let this opertunity slip of Informing you that we have Recd them in Good Order, & shall not fail to Accept yr kind offer to Procure us more when we have Ability to send for them.

In the mean Time if opertunity Presents & any new Fashon comes out of Caps, or Hankerchifs, Ruffels, Aprons, Cloaks, hatts, shaids or Bonetts, & you will be kind anouf to send me Paterns cut in Paper with Directions how to make them, & how they are worn, it will Add still Grater obligations & shall be Gratfully Acknolidged by your

Humble Servant

my Daughters send there complyments & thanks

JANE MECOM

To Mrs Stevenson London

the colors are Good we shall be glad of som when we send again. I send a Line Inclosed to my Brother which Pleas to send back to Him if He is come away

JM


"She was Every thing to me"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Jane's daughter Mary had died in September at the house of her mother's friend Kezia Coffin in Nantucket. A few sentences from the letter written "some time ago," October 23, and now missing, were printed in Sparks, Works, VII, 515n. "Sorrows roll upon me like the waves of the sea. I am hardly allowed time to fetch my breath. I am broken with breach upon breach, and I have now, in the first flow of my grief, been almost ready to say, 'What have I more?' But God forbid, that I should indulge that thought, though I have lost another child. God is sovereign, and I submit." Franklin's daughter Sarah had married Richard Bache at Philadelphia in October. John Winthrop, professor of astronomy and natural history at Harvard, was one of Franklin's regular correspondents on scientific matters. The words "to were our old cloaths over again" echo the final reply in Franklin Examination before the House of Commons.]

-98-

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