The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

I write this Line just to let you know I am well, Thanks to God, and to cover a Paper of mine printed here, which I send because you desired I would send you what I published from time to time, and I am willing to oblige you; but often they are things out of your way so much that I omit sending them, and sometimes I forget it, and sometimes I cannot get a Copy to send, which was the Case of a Piece since this now enclos'd, viz. An Edict of the King of Prussia, all that were printed being gone in a few Hours.

I hope you & Jenny & her Husband continue well which to hear will always be a Pleasure to

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN


"I have been saucy"

[Reproduced in facsimile in the Library Bulletin 1944 of the American Philosophical Society, from the manuscript in the Society; and first printed in Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiographical Writings, pp. 297-298. The next-to-the-last paragraph was printed in Sparks, Familiar Letters, p. 120n., with no indication of the person to whom the observation was addressed. "Coz. Jenny's" (that is, Jane Mecom's daughter Jane's) verses are missing. The news of the death of Jane Mecom "Neighbor Hall" had been, it appears, reported in her missing letter of June 28. The Massachusetts Gazette for June 14 to June 21 of that year announced the death of "Hugh Hall, Esq; aged 80." Hugh Hall, graduate of Harvard, slave trader, and owner of a good deal of Boston real estate, had formerly lived near the Orange Tree Inn, which would have made him a neighbor of Jane Mecom, though it does not appear just where he lived when he died. Sibley's Harvard Graduates, VI, 11-18. By referring to him as "Neighbor Hall" Franklin was clearly distinguishing Hugh Hall from the tardy Samuel Hall who had lately settled his account with Franklin to the benefit of his sister.]

London Nov. 1. 1773

DEAR SISTER,

I received your kind Letter of June 28. with great Pleasure, as it inform'd me of your Welfare.

I thank you for your good Wishes, that I may be a means of restoring Harmony between the two Countries. It would make me very happy to see it, whoever was the Instrument. I had

-142-

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