The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

Society. Franklin had come from Congress to Washington's Headquarters with Benjamin Harrison of Virginia and Thomas Lynch of South Carolina. While in Cambridge he met John Adams's wife Abigail and General Nathanael Greene.]

Head Quarters, Camp
at Cambridge. Oct. 16.
1775.

MY DEAR DEAR SISTER

I arrived here last Night with two other Delegates of the Congress. I suppose we may stay here about a Week.--In order to take you home with me, I purpose quitting their Company, purchasing a Carriage and Horses, and calling for you at good Mrs Greene's. But let me hear from you in the mean time, and acquaint me with any thing you would have me do or get towards the Convenience of our Journey. My Love to that hospitable Family, whom I hope soon to have the Pleasure of seeing. I am ever

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN


Jane Mecom to Catharine Greene

[Printed first in Roelker, Benjamin Franklin and Catharine Ray Greene, pp. 61-63, and here printed again from a copy in the American Philosophical Society. Catharine Ray, though only twenty years younger than Jane Mecom, affectionately called herself the daughter of a woman she liked and admired so much. Jane Mecom's "distracted" sons were Benjamin and Peter. Her son Josiah had enlisted in Captain Charles Furbush's company of Colonel Ebenezer Bridge's Massachusetts regiment on May 29, 1775, and served two months and eight days. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution, x, 591. The cause and circumstances of his death have not come to light. Catharine Greene's son Ray, then ten years old, had accompanied Jane Mecom and Franklin to Philadelphia to enter the Academy there. On the way they had stopped at the "magnificient" house of Governor William Franklin at Perth Amboy. If Jane Mecom was aware of the breach between father and son, at least she did not mention it in this letter. The "young Gentleman" who set Ray a "compleat Example of good maners" was probably William Temple Franklin, then a student at the College, which was another name for the Academy. The "Mr Mumford" whom Jane Mecom had not seen has not been identified. Since the letter from Catharine Greene here answered is missing, it does not appear what was

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