The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

the Distance of a Mile you must have been much alarm'd. We have given them a little Taste of this Disturbance upon their own Coasts this Summer: And tho' we have burnt none of their Towns, we have occasioned a good deal of Terror & Bustle in many of them, as they imagined our Commodore Jones had 4000. Troops with him for Descent. He has however taken and destroyed upwards of twenty Sail of their Merchantmen or Colliers, with two Men of War, and is arrived safe in Holland with 400. Prisoners. Had not contrary Winds and Accidents prevented it, the intended Invasion of England with the combined Fleet and a great Army might have taken Place, and have made the English feel a little more of that kind of Distress they have so wantonly caused in America.

I come now to your last of July 27. I am glad to learn by it that my dear Sister continued in good Health and good Spirits; and that she had learnt not to be afraid of her Friend Fresh Air.

You will do me a great deal of Pleasure in sending me as you propose, some Crown Soap, the very best that can be made. I shall have an Opportunity of obliging some Friends with it, who very much admire the little Specimens I have been able to give them. With the tenderest Affection I am ever, my Dear Sister,

Your very loving Brother.

B FRANKLIN

My Love to Mr & Mrs Greene & to my young Friend Ray. Temple desires me to present you his Affectionate Respects.


"You can never want friends"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The likeness of Franklin to which his sister referred was the engraved portrait in the ( Euvres de M. Franklin ( Paris, 1773). Franklin, in a letter to his wife, September 1, 1773, called it "a Print of me, which, tho' a Copy of that by Chamberlin, has got so French a Countenance, that you would take me for one of that lively Nation." John Adams had taken the crown soap to Franklin.]

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