The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

"The Glorious News"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 116-117, and now printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "Glorious News we have now recd from the Southard" was the news of Cornwallis's surrender at Yorktown, which had been printed, on the Monday this letter was written, in the Boston Gazette. Word had been brought to Providence by the schooner Adventure, Captain Lovett, and from Providence to Boston by an express rider who had arrived on "Friday morning last." The sermon which Jane Mecom sent to her brother was .A Sermon preached before the Honorable Council, and the Honorable House of Representatives of the State of Massachusetts-Bay, in New England, at Boston, May 26, 1779. Being the Anniversary of the Honorable Council. By Samuel Stillman, A. M. Boston, 1779.]

Boston Oct 29 1781

My DEAR BROTHER

I See you do not forgit me tho I have so Long mourned the want of a line from your own hand to convince me of it. March- 79 being the date of the Last I have recd from you, but I have Just now recvd a large Package from cousen Jonathan Williams by your order of considerable Valeu but have not yet time to know Exactly, they are things much saught for by our Dressing Ladies which will procure monny tho I thank God, & you, I have not wanted any Good thing, I live very comfortable with my Grand Children for good liveing in the Famely; & your Bounty suplies me with all I ought to wish besides yr good company The Glorious News we have now recd from the Southard makes us Flater our selves you may Return to us soon, & Mr Williams Says live & Injoy helth & happynes twenty years yet; I have no such Expectation for my self, but I wish those a Blessing I may leve behind. I have at length found the Sermon you were desierous to see among Mr Stillmans & now send it; I hope it will git saif to hand & procure you some Pleasure to find such Worthys among us. I wrote from Cambridg where my Daughter Lives by a young man who I Expected was to Sail the next Day I am afraid you will think me two Presuming to Introduce to you Persons I know nothing of but by hearsay, but I am two apt to give wey to there Soliseta-

-212-

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