The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

tions & by that means have been troblesom to you, tho I hope yr long Expearance will Enable you to git rid of them if they Prove so.

I mentioned my being coming to Boston in Serch of a Book containing all yr Publick writings but I cannot yet find it the Person in whose hands I heard it was is gone out of town I have only Time to subscribe

yr most obliged Gratfull & affectionat Sister
JANE MECOM

Pray write me the Perticulars of the News they send from hear in a hand bill


"My litle wons are Interupting me"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The "grat present" Jane Mecom had received from Franklin through Jonathan Williams Jr. was, according to a letter from him to Franklin dated March 2, 1782, and in the American Philosophical Society, "Silk for Cloaks, &c. Gauze, Lace, Ribbon, Linnen, & Cambrick"--evidently to be sold by her in the informal trading she carried on in Rhode Island. Jane Flagg Greene had died on April 6 of that year. The prisoner of war for whom William Greene asked aid was Ezekiel Durfey, "a small officer on board of the Ship Tracy," as Greene wrote to Franklin on June 25. Catharine Greene on October 7, 1781, had written to tell Franklin that his brother James's son, Isaac Allen of the Morning Star, was a prisoner in England; and on May 8, 1782, that her sister Judith Ray Hubbart's youngest son Samuel, "a Lad of about 13 years old," was a prisoner in Ireland. A letter from Samuel Hubbart of February 12, 1781, to Franklin told of the boy's having been brought from Ireland to Plymouth.]

Warwick 17 June--1782

MY EVER DEAR BROTHER:

I wrot to you in october or Novr Last from Boston to thank you for the grat present I then recd throw the hands of young cousen Jonathan Williams, with wich I had no Leter from my Dear Brother nor have I recved any of a Later Date than two years ago Last march, Since my Return home my time & atention has been fill'd with Sickness & Deaths in the Famely in

-213-

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