The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

I have wrot many leters to you since I recved won I never atempt to give any acount of Publick affairs I sopose you constantly recive all from good hands I should neverthe less be gratified to to recive some from you I give you Joy of the birth of the Prince & as sinsearly of the Progres yr Granson makes in His Larning & the Honours conferd on Him for it, I hope you will Live to see him a worthy & Usefull man; I long to hear of Sturdy Bill, & the Rest of the Famely which I sopose is Increasd since I heard from them which is more than two years, I think I have wrote twice to them since, I beleve some of my leters to you miscarry, but I think they cannot to them as I wrot by Post.

I am Informed yr Health is so ferm & yr Spirits so good that I am not out of hopes of seeing you again in your Native Place if the War should ceace as some Imagin it will soon God grant it may for the the Ravages of war are Horrible we have been Lately surprised with a considerable fleets apearing as tho t[hey] Intended to Reposes Rhoad island but they Passd by affter 3 or four Days Alarm, In won of my Leters I wrot my thanks for the Present you sent me throw Cousen Jonathan williamss hands many of the Articles came seasonable for my own Use the Rest I sould & Put the monny to Intrest. I hope I shall be so Lucky as hear this gits saif to yr hand cousen williams tells me it will go by a very good opertunity if it should let me hear from you soon & Refresh the hart of yr

Ever affectionat Sister
JANE MECOM


"I thought he must be Cleaver"

[First printed, and hitherto only, in the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, LXXII ( 1948), 270-272, from the manuscript in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; and here printed, with some corrections, from that manuscript. Prudence Wright's son had told Jane Mecom of her brother's severe attack of the stone in the late summer of 1782; and of the impudent and demanding conduct of John Thayer in Paris. It was he whom Jane Mecom in this letter called "that, I had almost Sade worthles Litle Anemil Thare." The great-

-216-

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