The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

Benjamin's Children) do all in there Power to make me comfortable & I go some times to Boston where I am kindly Entertained by Cousen Williams & famely and see a few other Friends. I have won of my Deceasd Grand Daughters children with me & Expect to Return with it in the spring as there I Live very Pleasantly all the warm wether & can do a number of things nesesary for Him & the Children Exept He should git Him a nother wife which I beleve there is no grat Likelihood of He is so sensable it is Imposable to make up his Lose, she was Indeed an Extroydenary wife. Mr Williams will be able to Ansure you any questions you shall think fitt to Ask concerning me which might have been Tedious for you to have Read had I thought of any thing more to write, my Children Joyn in Love an duty with your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


Jane Mecom to Richard Bache

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the New York Public Library. The present of money mentioned by Jane Mecom in her letter of April 29, 1783, to Franklin had come to her through Richard Bache, in part in the form of a draft on John Hancock. Sarah Duffield, daughter of Edward Duffield, and Mrs. Samuel Meredith were friends of the Baches whom Jane Mecom had met in Philadelphia.]

Cambridge Aprin 11-1783

SIR

yours of Decr 4th came to my hand about a Fortnight ago your Draughts were Deuly Paid, Mr Hancocks on sight; I thank you for yr care in the Afare, my Brother was Allways a Good & kind Benifacter to me but I had not had a Line from Him for three years Past till since I recd yours, I have receved won I sopose by way of Philadelphia as it came by Post, but the won you mention to have forwarded I have never Recived.

The complaint of forgitfullnes I think Lys on my side as I have wrot twice to you or my Neice since I had a Line from Ither till now, the Neglegt of corispondence betwen us is much Regretted by me for I Long to hear all about you, & Each of

-218-

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