The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

am Informed since I came to Town that Mr Williams had recved the other.--

I yester day recved a Leter from Mrs Bache She Informs me she Expects you Home this Sumer that She & her children are all well her Husband Gone to New York. I was quite in a weak State when I came to Boston but find myself gro stronger Every Day Porpose to go to the State of Rhoad Island in about a Fortnight to Spend the Summer I think if you come to America & come this way you will not Fail to call on me & our Good Friend Greene She Desiered me Long ago to tell you how Happy She was in the Acquaintance of some Gentleman you Recomended to them, how Exactly He ansures yor Discription, but I then forgot it & cant now Remember the Name. I heard from there Lately they are all well have an Increec of Grand chilldren which makes them very Happy.

I percive Mr Williams is Highly Pleased with His Entertainment in France writs about going to England & not Returning in Less than a year However that may be I shall chirish some Hopes that you will come with Him tho on second tho[ught] I think it will be two valeuable a Treasure among our famelyes to venture in won Botome but I Shall depend on that Provedence which has hitherto Been your Preserver Protecter & Defender and am as Ever your affectionat and

obliged Sister
JANE MECOM

My Love to W T F whose Hand writing in your Leter & His name in the Signing the Trety as a Secratery gives me Pleasure


Jane Mecom to Sarah Bache

[Here first printed from a copy in the Yale University Library. The third of Jane Greene's children, Jane, had died on April 27, 1783, but her great-grandmother had not yet heard of it.]

-222-

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