The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

sold them, perhaps it may be adviseable to put the Money at Interest, that it may produce you a little Income.

My two Grandsons are now both with me and present their Duty. I am ever, my dear Sister,

Your affectionate Brother
B FRANKLIN


"To settle in the House at Boston"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. The signature and the final words of farewell were cut off, presumably by some early autograph collector. The house in Boston which Jane Mecom was to consider her own was that which had formerly belonged to Elizabeth Douse and from which since 1763 Jane Mecom had been receiving the rent.]

Passy, June 17. 1784.

DEAR SISTER,

It is long since I have had the Pleasure of hearing from you, but am glad to hear by Cousin Williams that you were well the Beginning of this Year, and about to settle in the House at Boston, which you may consider as your own, and I hope you will be happy in it.

I continue, Thanks to God, in very good Health, being at present only troubled with the Stone; which sometimes gives me a little Pain, & prevents my going in a Carriage where there are Pavements, but does not otherwise make me very unhappy; as I can take the Exercise of Walking, eat, drink, sleep, read, write and enjoy the Conversation of my Friends as usual.--Give my Love to your Daughter, and believe [signature missing]


"In your House at the North End"

[Printed first in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 130-132, and here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. At the time of this letter Jane Mecom had been living in the Unity Street house about six months. A letter from Jonathan Williams Sr., dated December 29, 1783, and in the American Philosophical Society, informed Franklin that his sister expected to move into the

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