The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

Borrow of won & a nother of my Acquaintance from time to time such as I have a mind to Read.

my Daughter is Returnd from the Country much mended in her health, she with my grand daughter Jenny mecom Deserer there duty

Remember my Love to Mr & Mrs Bache & all the children

Your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

[Postscript on cover] I wrote Mrs Bache by a Vesel some time ago


"Presents to Friends in France"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. "Cousin Jonathan," Jonathan Williams Jr., who had accompanied Franklin from France, had lost all his money in shipping ventures, and now thought of soap-making as a possible new business.]

Philada Oct. 27. 1785

DEAR SISTER,

I was just going to write to you for Information whether the Bill I drew on Dr Cooper before his Death, had ever been paid; and the Pen was in my hand, when I receiv'd your kind Letter of the 19th Instant, acquainting me that Cousin Williams had receiv'd the Money, of which I am very glad,--on your Account.

This will be delivered by our Cousin Jonathan, whom I very much esteem for his many valuable Qualities. He was very desirous in France of knowing how to make Crown Soap, and I promis'd him a Copy of the Receipt you were once so good as to write for me: But in my Absence it is lost with many other of my Papers.--You will oblige me by writing it over again for me, but more by making a Parcel for me of 40 or 50 pounds weight, which I want for Presents to Friends in France who very much admir'd it. Jonathan will be glad to assist you (for the Instruction's sake) in the working Part. I wish it to be of the greenish Sort that is close and solid and hard like the Speci-

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