The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

March 1773 Williams paid £5 12s. for "Behmens Works" ordered from London through Franklin.]

Boston Novr 7--1785

DEAR BROTHER

You must Indulge me in writing often to you since I cannot see you, this is the third since yr Last to me I should not have wrot again so soon for fear of being troblesom but on seeing Mr williams He Desiered me to make an Apology to you for his not writing, Said he had been Giulty of a Criminal Neglect, that he had not the Less Gratitude for all yr Favours or Veneration for your character, Says He has Atempted Several times to write you to congratulate you on yr Arival but his Afflictions have Presd on Him so hard he could not compose his mind to write; and Indeed He is in a Deplorable Situation, Distress and Anguish in His Countenance, no Apetite, to his food, Emaciated to amazing degree; and so feble he can hardly walk, He says he shall not Live to see you & I am of the mind he will not if he has not speedy Releaf, he says there is no cure for a Distresd mind, his wife tells me he Poisons Himself working on Nights trying Experiments with Poisonous Drugs but this is what she must not be soposd to know, I think it is Likely you know from his Son Jonathan the Situation of his Famely, and some Diffeculties he is under which are Atended with such Agrevations as he is not Able to bare. His wife soports her self Exeding well under all.

as to my self I Live very much to my Likeing, I never had a Tast for High Life, for Large companys, & Entertainments, I am of Popes mind that Health, Peace, and Competance, come as near to Happynes as is Atainable in this Life, and I am in a good measure In possession of all three at Present, if they are at Times a Litle Infringd ocationaly or by Accedent, I Vew it as the common Lot of all and am not much Disturbed.

our Friend Cathrine Greene Expresd such Lively Joy at the News of yr Arival that her children tould Her it had thron her in to Histericks but she says she is not subject to that Disorder She tells me you have Honord them with a Leter

I wrot the Above some time ago since which Mr Williams is

-244-

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