The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

very much fear the Impropriety of my giveing you the Troble of so much as Reading this Acount of the matter but they Plead your Humanity & I was forcd to Promis I would mention it to you.

If the Lad writs the Truth & there can be a way found out that will Ansure the Penalty of the Law by Binding him to serve some won at Sea, which he has been Used to, that he may not suffer throw a winter in a Prison & your Speaking about the Affair will Prevent it I wish it but I know nothing of the Lad he may Deserve a Halter for all I know notwithstanding his being a Branch of a Good famely, you can know the Truth of the mater Prehaps if you Inquier but I fear I have made two free with you on the Acount forgive me & tell me so if I have.

My Daughter Joins me in most Dutyfull and and Affectionat Regards

JANE MECOM


"I ought to let you know the Truth"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Jane Mecom appears to be saying that the soap she now sent to Franklin was made at the house of Catharine Greene, but she actually meant that she had made there the soap of a particular green which he had asked for in his letter of October 27. Peter Collas on October 12, 1779, had written that he was sending Franklin 27 cakes of crown soap made by Jane Mecom at Governor Greene's. The Collas letter is in the American Philosophical Society.)

Boston Decr 29--1785

DEAR BROTHER

I send with this a Box of soap containing Sixty Pounds it is good & soled but not so high a green colar as the sample you sent I thought it best to make it acording to Ruil as cousen Jonathan was to Inspect it and the Extraordenary Green colar of that was Produced by a circumstance which I should not be willing to Put in Practice if I had opertunity fearing it might not be wholsom if any of it should be Used as medison, I made it at our Friend Greenes in a Brass ketle [interlined: by the way it must all ways be brass or copper] & some circumstance which I have forgot causd an Intermition of I beleve a week

-247-

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