The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

I want to hear somthing about my Nephue Benjamin how he goes on since he came home and all about all the Litle wons my young Niece in Perticular* that made me such a Present it is very much Admiered as well as her writing by so young a Person, I Design to writ to her mamah when I send the soap the crums of soap you sent me Retain the coular and smell well & I dont know but you will prefer it to send to France If it Units as I wish but I will send this by the first Vesel, cousen Jonathan is hear has Indevoured to see Mr Vaughan but had not when I heard from him Last Remember me to yr Famely

yr affectionate Sister

JANE MECOM


"The Hansomest cakes to send to France"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. John Vaughan had seen Franklin in Philadelphia. The grandson Jane Mecom mentioned was Josiah Flagg. There is a draft of a part of this letter, with a few variants, on the back of Franklin's letter of April 25 of that year. "I mention these things that you may see that I do Injoy Life hear, but Truly my Dear Brother I am willing to Depart out of it when ever my Grat Benifacter has no farther Use for me. for tho but litle of that apears to me now I know the most Insignificant creature on Eirth may be made some Use of In the Scale of beings, may Touch some Spring, or Verge to some wheal unpercived by us; may I not Live to hear of the Departure of so Benificial an Agent as my Dear Brother." The letter was sent in care of Captain Cob or Cobb (not further identified) with the box of soap which was to be left with the Philadelphia merchants Hughes and Anthony. The Philadelphia Directory for 1785 gives their address as the Chestnut Street wharf.]

DEAR BROTHER

Boston May 29th 1786

with this I send you a Box with four Dozn crown soap which I hope will Ansure yr Expectation but it does not Perfectly Pleas me yet, but I find my self so often disopointed when I am

____________________
*
Sett Josiah to write me those Perticulars. favoured by Cutting Esq.

-268-

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