The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

and litle maters in other mens Shops as he is able, and she has done Every kind of thing that she was able to git a liveing (& she is Ingenious and Industrious) till she grew so Decriped & Inferm that for some years she has been allmost Inteirly Deprived of the use of her Lims, & they Live mostly on the charity of Friends among whome I have not been alltogather neglegent of contributing my mite, but I think ought to be but a mite without yr Premishon on whos Bounty I Live.

[Unsigned]


"You have Never Deniged any Request I made"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

Boston Nov 5--1786

DEAR BROTHER

I have acording to your very Affectionate Desire taken in ten cord of wood for which I shall Draw a bill on you as you Directed, I Dont know as yet in whose Faver, Mr. Collas Layd in four cord before he went away so that we shall have Plenty should your Prognosticator's hapen to be in the Right,

I dont know but I deserve to be cencered of those unreasonable Persons to whom if you give an Inch they will take an Ell, for you only Desiered the Pleasure of helping to keep me warm but I Remembred another Expresion you wrot to cousen Jonathan Last winter that you would not have me Pinch, & you see now I have Effectuly garded against it, I also did take the Liberty to send a small Portion to the Poor Famely I mentiond, for you are so good you have Never Deniged any Request I made you, if you think I have Presumed too far you will only Laugh at it a litle, but you must give me a caution not to make so free with you another time.

My Por Daughter who has often Expresd a desire to be like you in Every thing now finds she would willingly be Excused from Pertaking the same Infermities since she has not your Philosephy to bare it She has got I think the Gout to a grat degree but she however acknolidges it is Easeyer borne than

-286-

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