The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

the disorder in her stomack which is Removed, I hope it may soon go off. Remember my Love to Mr and Mrs Bache & all the Children, and Accept yr Self the most Gratfull thanks from your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

Remember my love to cousen Jonathan
My Daughter Desiers you would
Accept her thanks as She will
Pertake of the Benifit with me


"You have not mentioned this Family"

[Here first printed from the letter-press copy in the Library of Congress. Anthony Stickney of Chester, New Hampshire, had written to Franklin on July 22 of that year. The letter is in the American Philosophical Society.]

Philada Dec. 3. 1786

DEAR SISTER,

I have to acknowledge the Receipt of two or three kind Letters from you since I wrote to you. I have been much busied in Building. I hope you receiv'd the Barrel of Flour I sent you. I approve of the friendly Disposition you made of some of your Wood. I wish you a comfortable Winter. It begins to set in here, but my Buildings are now covered so as to fear no Damage from the Weather. We are all well and send our Loves & Duties. I have lately receiv'd a Letter from a Person who subscribes himself Stickney, says he is a Grandson of my Sister Davenport, and has a son named Benjn Franklin, to whom he desires to give a good Education, but cannot well afford it. You have not mentioned this Family in the List you sent me. Do you know any thing of them? I am ever, my dear Sister

Your affectionate Brother

B FRANKLIN

Mrs Mecom

[In the margin] Your Bill for the Wood has not yet appeared. If you find it difficult to sell such a Bill, let me know the Sum and I will send one for you to receive the Money in Boston.

-287-

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