The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

father Lived to be above 90 year old but He and his Daughter Dieing Left the house to our cousen but they could not feed long upon that, he Therefore took a Prudent Step sould it & bought a good Farm at Derry, & went to Live on it where his wife helpd to work on it & thay got to Live Extradinery well, but she Mrs Rodgers thinks shortned her Days by too hard Labour, & her husband Died soon Affter her & left the Farm to this man & a sister who are all the children they left & who live to gather on it & do very well, She says he has a Good charecter as a Sober Honest man but does not Increce his Estate as won tould her he Entertaind too many Strangers in hopes of Entertaing Angels unawares, She says she saw Him about a year & half a go & he tould her he had such a son that he Named for you, that he gave him all the Education he was able, but she thinks him very Bold in writing to you She is shure she shuld not have don it, as to the Boy I omited to Inquire Perticularly about him as the carrage waited for me Put it out of my mind we have had a short spell of moderate wether I am as well in Health as useal my Daughter growing beter slowly She Joyns me in Duty & love to you & yours with your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


"You must build an Academy"

[Printed first and hitherto only in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 155-156; here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Morgan Stillman was a son of Samuel Stillman and a nephew of Dr. John Morgan. The "sisters Grandson" was Anthony Stickney. The "Grate-Grandson" who might have claims on Franklin was Franklin Greene, of whom Jane Mecom had written to her brother on December 29, 1780, that she and the child's parents had "left out the Benjamin that he might not be called ben."]

DEAR BROTHER Boston March 9 1787

I Embrace this opertunity by my Neibour Mr Morgan Stillman, who is by his Uncle Dr Morgans Invitation Going to Settle in yr City, as he is a young Gentleman who bares a good

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